Nurses' Spiritual Care Practices: Initial Psychometrics of a New Tool and Correlates of Spiritual Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304223
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Spiritual Care Practices: Initial Psychometrics of a New Tool and Correlates of Spiritual Care
Author(s):
Mamier, Iris; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Winslow, Betty J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Alpha
Author Details:
Iris Mamier, PhD, MSN, RN, imamier@llu.edu; Elizabeth Johnston Taylor, PhD, MSN, RN; Betty J. Winslow, PhD, MSN, RN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013

Purpose: To explore the type, frequency, and correlates of nurses’ spiritual care practices in a U.S. tertiary health care system.

Methods: In a descriptive, correlational study, a convenience sample of 554 Registered Nurses (RNs) employed at a faith-based health system participated in an online survey. The study evaluated the factor structure of the 17-item Nurses’ Spiritual Care Practice Questionnaire (NSCQ) using exploratory factor analysis. After descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with frequency of spiritual care practice (SCP).

Results: Factorial validity and internal reliability of the NSCQ were established and nurses’ most (and least) frequently implemented practices were identified. The one-dimensional solution (extraction method = principal axis) yielded individual factor loadings between .407 and .836 and accounted for 49.5% of the variance. Cronbach’s alpha reliability coefficient was 0.93. While responses indicated that these RN’s spiritual care practices were relatively infrequent, items showed sufficient variability. Although work shift, previous spiritual care education, and nurse comfort level with spiritual care were significantly associated with frequency of SCP, no demographic variables were significant.

In the final multivariate model, four predictors explained 32.4% of the total variance for SCP frequency. These predictors included: Nurses’ perception that spiritual issues at the work place came up frequently, self-reported spirituality, work in a non-pediatric setting, and previous education about spiritual care.

Conclusion: This study introduces a new, reliable assessment instrument for nurse-provided spiritual care over a defined period of time. The fact that nurses who previously received education about spiritual care scored higher on the NSCQ encourages efforts to train nurses in spiritual care. The NSCQ allows for comparisons across specialty environments particularly in adult acute and mental health care and can be used by educators, administrators, and clinical researchers to quantify types and frequency of SCP.

Keywords:
factor analysis; tool development; spiritual care
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Spiritual Care Practices: Initial Psychometrics of a New Tool and Correlates of Spiritual Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMamier, Irisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Elizabeth Johnstonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinslow, Betty J.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Alphaen_GB
dc.author.detailsIris Mamier, PhD, MSN, RN, imamier@llu.edu; Elizabeth Johnston Taylor, PhD, MSN, RN; Betty J. Winslow, PhD, MSN, RN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304223-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>To explore the type, frequency, and correlates of nurses’ spiritual care practices in a U.S. tertiary health care system. <p><b>Methods: </b>In a descriptive, correlational study, a convenience sample of 554 Registered Nurses (RNs) employed at a faith-based health system participated in an online survey. The study evaluated the factor structure of the 17-item Nurses’ Spiritual Care Practice Questionnaire (NSCQ) using exploratory factor analysis. After descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with frequency of spiritual care practice (SCP). <p><b>Results: </b>Factorial validity and internal reliability of the NSCQ were established and nurses’ most (and least) frequently implemented practices were identified. The one-dimensional solution (extraction method = principal axis) yielded individual factor loadings between .407 and .836 and accounted for 49.5% of the variance. Cronbach’s alpha reliability coefficient was 0.93. While responses indicated that these RN’s spiritual care practices were relatively infrequent, items showed sufficient variability. Although work shift, previous spiritual care education, and nurse comfort level with spiritual care were significantly associated with frequency of SCP, no demographic variables were significant. <p>In the final multivariate model, four predictors explained 32.4% of the total variance for SCP frequency. These predictors included: Nurses’ perception that spiritual issues at the work place came up frequently, self-reported spirituality, work in a non-pediatric setting, and previous education about spiritual care. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>This study introduces a new, reliable assessment instrument for nurse-provided spiritual care over a defined period of time. The fact that nurses who previously received education about spiritual care scored higher on the NSCQ encourages efforts to train nurses in spiritual care. The NSCQ allows for comparisons across specialty environments particularly in adult acute and mental health care and can be used by educators, administrators, and clinical researchers to quantify types and frequency of SCP.en_GB
dc.subjectfactor analysisen_GB
dc.subjecttool developmenten_GB
dc.subjectspiritual careen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:31:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:31:31Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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