2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304229
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Adult Kids Know Enough About Their Parents' Wishes for End-of-Life?
Author(s):
Hattori, Keiko; Ito, Misae
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Psi
Author Details:
Keiko Hattori, RN, PhD, khattori@mw.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Misae Ito, RN, RMW, MSN, PhD;
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose: Advance directives have not been legalized in Japan although over 80% of the population were in favor of this idea.  The Japanese elders believe that childrens' making decision for their parents is emotional burden and they want to avoid it.  The culturally shared mind for decision-making at the end-of-life among Japanese elders is "Children know our wishes."  However, family, especially children, might not play the culturally expected role anymore.  The recent economical crisis and declining the birth rates have led to dramatic changes in family structures and roles.  The purpose of this study was to clarify the gap in wishes for end-of-life between Japanese elders and their family members.

Methods: The total 1,000 paper-based questionnaires were distributed to elders and their family members in three prefectures in Japan.  Such three prectures were randomly selected based on its population size and aging rate.  The questionnaire asked for their backgrond, family functions, and wishes for thier end-of-life. Chi-square was used to analysis the data.

Results: The response rate has been around 80% (it's ongoing project). The participants living in larger cities have higher response rate, so that they have more interested in issues in advance directives.  One prefecture with smaill population size refused to participate in this research because they had felt barriers to ask end-of-lfe questions to elders.  So far, regionally influence was one of the factors of determining the gap.  The detailed analysis should be reported after all the questionnaires are returned.

Conclusion: The societal changes has been influencing the cultural decision-making process.  Nurses should assess the characteristics of individual's decision-making responses.

Keywords:
advance directives; elders; family
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Adult Kids Know Enough About Their Parents' Wishes for End-of-Life?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHattori, Keikoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIto, Misaeen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Psien_GB
dc.author.detailsKeiko Hattori, RN, PhD, khattori@mw.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Misae Ito, RN, RMW, MSN, PhD;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304229-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>Advance directives have not been legalized in Japan although over 80% of the population were in favor of this idea.  The Japanese elders believe that childrens' making decision for their parents is emotional burden and they want to avoid it.  The culturally shared mind for decision-making at the end-of-life among Japanese elders is "Children know our wishes."  However, family, especially children, might not play the culturally expected role anymore.  The recent economical crisis and declining the birth rates have led to dramatic changes in family structures and roles.  The purpose of this study was to clarify the gap in wishes for end-of-life between Japanese elders and their family members. <p><b>Methods: </b>The total 1,000 paper-based questionnaires were distributed to elders and their family members in three prefectures in Japan.  Such three prectures were randomly selected based on its population size and aging rate.  The questionnaire asked for their backgrond, family functions, and wishes for thier end-of-life. Chi-square was used to analysis the data. <p><b>Results: </b>The response rate has been around 80% (it's ongoing project). The participants living in larger cities have higher response rate, so that they have more interested in issues in advance directives.  One prefecture with smaill population size refused to participate in this research because they had felt barriers to ask end-of-lfe questions to elders.  So far, regionally influence was one of the factors of determining the gap.  The detailed analysis should be reported after all the questionnaires are returned. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>The societal changes has been influencing the cultural decision-making process.  Nurses should assess the characteristics of individual's decision-making responses.en_GB
dc.subjectadvance directivesen_GB
dc.subjecteldersen_GB
dc.subjectfamilyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:31:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:31:39Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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