Acculturation, Mental Health, and Safety Behaviors Among Abused Immigrant Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304231
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation, Mental Health, and Safety Behaviors Among Abused Immigrant Women
Author(s):
Nava, Angeles; McFarlane, Judith; Montalvo-Liendo, Nora; Gilroy, Heidi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Angeles Nava, PhD, gela@barringer1.com; Judith McFarlane, DrPH; Nora Montalvo-Liendo, PhD, RN; Heidi Gilroy, MSN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose: Intimate partner violence and migration are global phenomena which often have a negative impact on women’s mental health and their safety. The mental wellbeing and safety of abused immigrant women may be further compromised as they acculturate. To determine the relationship of acculturation and severity of violence, danger for murder, mental health, and safety behaviors of abused immigrant women. 

Methods: Base line data of a 7-year prospective study of 106 abused immigrant women who were first time users of safe shelter or justice services.  The instruments included the Severity of Violence Against Women Scale, Danger Assessment, Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Safety Behavior Checklist, and Acculturation for Hispanics instruments.

 Results: A significant (p<0.05) positive correlation between acculturation and safety behaviors and BSI scores was established.  Higher acculturation scores were associated with significantly more practiced safety behaviors and higher levels of depression.

 Conclusion: Understanding the specific needs of abuse immigrant women associated with acculturation is imperative to develop interventions to interrupt abuse and promote safety and mental well-being.

Keywords:
Safety Behaviors; Acculturation, Immigrants; Mental Health
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation, Mental Health, and Safety Behaviors Among Abused Immigrant Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNava, Angelesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, Judithen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMontalvo-Liendo, Noraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGilroy, Heidien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAngeles Nava, PhD, gela@barringer1.com; Judith McFarlane, DrPH; Nora Montalvo-Liendo, PhD, RN; Heidi Gilroy, MSN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304231-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>Intimate partner violence and migration are global phenomena which often have a negative impact on women’s mental health and their safety. The mental wellbeing and safety of abused immigrant women may be further compromised as they acculturate. To determine the relationship of acculturation and severity of violence, danger for murder, mental health, and safety behaviors of abused immigrant women.  <p><b>Methods: </b>Base line data of a 7-year prospective study of 106 abused immigrant women who were first time users of safe shelter or justice services.  The instruments included the Severity of Violence Against Women Scale, Danger Assessment, Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Safety Behavior Checklist, and Acculturation for Hispanics instruments. <p> <b>Results: </b>A significant (p<0.05) positive correlation between acculturation and safety behaviors and BSI scores was established.  Higher acculturation scores were associated with significantly more practiced safety behaviors and higher levels of depression. <p> <b>Conclusion: </b>Understanding the specific needs of abuse immigrant women associated with acculturation is imperative to develop interventions to interrupt abuse and promote safety and mental well-being.en_GB
dc.subjectSafety Behaviorsen_GB
dc.subjectAcculturation, Immigrantsen_GB
dc.subjectMental Healthen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:31:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:31:40Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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