2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304248
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborating with Schools for Recruitment of Participants
Author(s):
Bartlett, Robin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Zeta
Author Details:
Robin Bartlett, PhD, RN, robin_bartlett@uncg.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose: When children and families are the focus of a research project, schools can be a viable recruitment location. Since most children attend school and school ends at predictable times, school buildings can be a convenient location for the conduct of research if trust and partnerships between researchers and school personnel are cultivated. In addition, schools are typically considered safe by students and parents and because they are a familiar location, directions and transportation issues may be less challenging. The purpose of this presentation is to examine issues to consider when forging relationships with schools and to identify strategies for successfully entering into partnerships.

Methods: A series of three intervention studies with middle school age girls and their mothers were conducted using schools as the site of recruitment and intervention delivery for girls.

Results: Developing relationships between researchers and school personnel is critical. The topic under study can influence whether school leaders will permit researchers to recruit study participants from the school. Incentives or staff salary support for the school may be an important factor in a school’s decision to allow researchers to have access to their students and building. Detailed protocols for recruitment and intervention delivery must be agreed upon by researchers and school leaders. Mechanisms for protection of students and families must be in place in order for schools to participate in collaborations with researchers. School IRB or other approvals may be required.

Conclusion: Schools can be a viable source for recruitment of child and family study participants. In addition, it can be a potential venue for the conduct of research studies. Researchers must develop collaborative relationships with school personnel and have detailed protocols in order for effective partnerships to form.

Keywords:
children; schools; recruitment
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborating with Schools for Recruitment of Participantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Robinen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Zetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsRobin Bartlett, PhD, RN, robin_bartlett@uncg.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304248-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> When children and families are the focus of a research project, schools can be a viable recruitment location. Since most children attend school and school ends at predictable times, school buildings can be a convenient location for the conduct of research if trust and partnerships between researchers and school personnel are cultivated. In addition, schools are typically considered safe by students and parents and because they are a familiar location, directions and transportation issues may be less challenging. The purpose of this presentation is to examine issues to consider when forging relationships with schools and to identify strategies for successfully entering into partnerships. <p><b>Methods: </b>A series of three intervention studies with middle school age girls and their mothers were conducted using schools as the site of recruitment and intervention delivery for girls. <p><b>Results: </b> Developing relationships between researchers and school personnel is critical. The topic under study can influence whether school leaders will permit researchers to recruit study participants from the school. Incentives or staff salary support for the school may be an important factor in a school’s decision to allow researchers to have access to their students and building. Detailed protocols for recruitment and intervention delivery must be agreed upon by researchers and school leaders. Mechanisms for protection of students and families must be in place in order for schools to participate in collaborations with researchers. School IRB or other approvals may be required. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Schools can be a viable source for recruitment of child and family study participants. In addition, it can be a potential venue for the conduct of research studies. Researchers must develop collaborative relationships with school personnel and have detailed protocols in order for effective partnerships to form.en_GB
dc.subjectchildrenen_GB
dc.subjectschoolsen_GB
dc.subjectrecruitmenten_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:32:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:32:03Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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