Breastfeeding Behavior and Sleep of New Mothers in a Predominantly Low-Income and Ethnically Diverse Sample

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304293
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding Behavior and Sleep of New Mothers in a Predominantly Low-Income and Ethnically Diverse Sample
Author(s):
Doan, Therese; Lee, Kathryn A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Eta
Author Details:
Therese Doan, RN, PhD, IBCLC, jungdoan@sfsu.edu; Kathryn A. Lee, RN, PhD, CBSM, FAAN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose: To add to current knowledge about sleep and breastfeeding behavior of new mothers in order to promote exclusive breastfeeding in the first month postpartum, a vulnerable time frame for infant formula supplementation and early breastfeeding cessation.

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe and compare the sleep of women who exclusively breastfed at night to those who used formula in the first month postpartum.

Methods: Both objective and subjective measures of sleep were obtained using actigraphy, diary, and self-report data from a predominantly low-income and ethnically diverse sample of 120 first-time mothers. Measures were collected in the last month of pregnancy and at one month postpartum. 'Feeding diaries were used to group mothers by nighttime infant feeding type.

Results: 'Mothers who used at least some formula at night (n=54) and those who used breastmilk exclusively (n=66) had similar sleep patterns in late pregnancy.' However, at one month postpartum, there was a significant group difference in nocturnal sleep as measured by actigraphy. Total nighttime sleep was 386'66 minutes for the exclusive breastfeeding group and 356'67 minutes for the formula group. The groups did not differ with respect to daytime sleep, wake after sleep onset, or subjective sleep disturbance at one month postpartum.

Conclusion: Exclusive breastfeeding women averaged 30 minutes more nocturnal sleep than women who used formula at night. New mothers should be encouraged to breastfeed exclusively since breastfeeding may promote sleep during postpartum recovery.

Keywords:
maternal; breastfeeding; sleep
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBreastfeeding Behavior and Sleep of New Mothers in a Predominantly Low-Income and Ethnically Diverse Sampleen
dc.contributor.authorDoan, Thereseen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kathryn A.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Etaen
dc.author.detailsTherese Doan, RN, PhD, IBCLC, jungdoan@sfsu.edu; Kathryn A. Lee, RN, PhD, CBSM, FAAN;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304293-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><strong><b>Purpose: </b></strong>To add to current knowledge about sleep and breastfeeding behavior of new mothers in order to promote exclusive breastfeeding in the first month postpartum, a vulnerable time frame for infant formula supplementation and early breastfeeding cessation. <p><b>Objective: </b>The objective of this study was to describe and compare the sleep of women who exclusively breastfed at night to those who used formula in the first month postpartum. <p><b><b>Methods: </b> </b>Both objective and subjective measures of sleep were obtained using actigraphy, diary, and self-report data from a predominantly low-income and ethnically diverse sample of 120 first-time mothers. Measures were collected in the last month of pregnancy and at one month postpartum. 'Feeding diaries were used to group mothers by nighttime infant feeding type. <p><b><b>Results: </b> '</b>Mothers who used at least some formula at night (n=54) and those who used breastmilk exclusively (n=66) had similar sleep patterns in late pregnancy.' However, at one month postpartum, there was a significant group difference in nocturnal sleep as measured by actigraphy. Total nighttime sleep was 386'66 minutes for the exclusive breastfeeding group and 356'67 minutes for the formula group. The groups did not differ with respect to daytime sleep, wake after sleep onset, or subjective sleep disturbance at one month postpartum. <p><b><b>Conclusion: </b> </b>Exclusive breastfeeding women averaged 30 minutes more nocturnal sleep than women who used formula at night. New mothers should be encouraged to breastfeed exclusively since breastfeeding may promote sleep during postpartum recovery.en
dc.subjectmaternalen
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen
dc.subjectsleepen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:33:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:33:00Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.