Targeted and Universal Early Home Visiting Programs: Public Health Nurses and Mothers Redefine Surveillance and Health Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304301
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Targeted and Universal Early Home Visiting Programs: Public Health Nurses and Mothers Redefine Surveillance and Health Outcomes
Author(s):
Price, Sheri; Young, Linda; Hart, Christine; Vukic, Adele; Aston, Megan; Randel, Pat; Kay, Janis; Inkpen, Kathy; Etowa, Josephine Bassey
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Sheri Price, RN PhD, pricesl@dal.ca; Linda Young, BSc, MPA; Christine Hart, RN, BA, BScN, IBCLC; Adele Vukic, RN, MN; Megan Aston, RN, PhD; Pat Randel, BA, MSc; Janis Kay, RN, MN; Kathy Inkpen, RN, BScN; Josephine B. Etowa, RN, PhD;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013

Purpose: Health promotion and protection of mothers, babies and their families in the early post partum period is essential for life-long health. Public health nurses provide early home visiting (EHV) for mothers, which has been proven to positively impact physical, social, emotional, and mental health outcomes of mothers and babies. Most of the research has focused on high risk or 'targeted' groups of mothers rather than 'universal' mothers. Further information is required to understand how mothers and families who are considered to be 'universal' are coping, many of whom may also be identified as 'targeted' and experiencing poor health outcomes. There is a significant gap in understanding which program best optimizes health outcomes for all families. The purpose of this research was to explore how universal and targeted EHV programs for mothers and babies were organized, delivered, and experienced through the everyday practices of PHNs, mothers, and managers in Nova Scotia'

Methods: Feminist poststructuralism was used to collect and analyze data through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 16 PHNs, 16 mothers, and 4 managers.

Results: The use of discourse analysis provided a lens to understand the beliefs and practices associated with the targeted and universal EHV programs. Mothers and PHNs praised, critiqued, and challenged various aspects of each of the programs. However, differences between the programs also created tensions and misunderstandings of the work of PHNs constructed through social and institutional discourses. Different types of families were stereotyped and much of the work of PHNs was invisible. This presentation will highlight four themes: 1) Mothering as a social and medical construct 2) Defining support 3) Redefining health outcomes 4) Shifting surveillance

Conclusion: Findings suggest that EHV programs need to be reorganized to better support the 21st century mother, baby and family.

Keywords:
mothers; early home visiting; public heatlh nurses
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleTargeted and Universal Early Home Visiting Programs: Public Health Nurses and Mothers Redefine Surveillance and Health Outcomesen
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Sherien
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Lindaen
dc.contributor.authorHart, Christineen
dc.contributor.authorVukic, Adeleen
dc.contributor.authorAston, Meganen
dc.contributor.authorRandel, Paten
dc.contributor.authorKay, Janisen
dc.contributor.authorInkpen, Kathyen
dc.contributor.authorEtowa, Josephine Basseyen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsSheri Price, RN PhD, pricesl@dal.ca; Linda Young, BSc, MPA; Christine Hart, RN, BA, BScN, IBCLC; Adele Vukic, RN, MN; Megan Aston, RN, PhD; Pat Randel, BA, MSc; Janis Kay, RN, MN; Kathy Inkpen, RN, BScN; Josephine B. Etowa, RN, PhD;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304301-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> Health promotion and protection of mothers, babies and their families in the early post partum period is essential for life-long health. Public health nurses provide early home visiting (EHV) for mothers, which has been proven to positively impact physical, social, emotional, and mental health outcomes of mothers and babies. Most of the research has focused on high risk or 'targeted' groups of mothers rather than 'universal' mothers. Further information is required to understand how mothers and families who are considered to be 'universal' are coping, many of whom may also be identified as 'targeted' and experiencing poor health outcomes. There is a significant gap in understanding which program best optimizes health outcomes for all families. The purpose of this research was to explore how universal and targeted EHV programs for mothers and babies were organized, delivered, and experienced through the everyday practices of PHNs, mothers, and managers in Nova Scotia' <p><b>Methods: </b> Feminist poststructuralism was used to collect and analyze data through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 16 PHNs, 16 mothers, and 4 managers. <p><b>Results: </b>The use of discourse analysis provided a lens to understand the beliefs and practices associated with the targeted and universal EHV programs. Mothers and PHNs praised, critiqued, and challenged various aspects of each of the programs. However, differences between the programs also created tensions and misunderstandings of the work of PHNs constructed through social and institutional discourses. Different types of families were stereotyped and much of the work of PHNs was invisible. This presentation will highlight four themes: 1) Mothering as a social and medical construct 2) Defining support 3) Redefining health outcomes 4) Shifting surveillance <p><b>Conclusion: </b>Findings suggest that EHV programs need to be reorganized to better support the 21<sup>st</sup> century mother, baby and family.en
dc.subjectmothersen
dc.subjectearly home visitingen
dc.subjectpublic heatlh nursesen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:33:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:33:07Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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