Nurse Initiated Intranasal Fentanyl to Improve Time to Analgesia for Children Presenting to Emergency with Suspected Limb Fracture

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304308
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Initiated Intranasal Fentanyl to Improve Time to Analgesia for Children Presenting to Emergency with Suspected Limb Fracture
Author(s):
Williams, Suzanne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Suzanne Williams, MNSc (NP), BN (Hons), Grad Cert Paed, Chld, Yth Hlth Nursing, Grad Cert Paed Crit Care Nursing, BHlthSc (Nursing), peterandsuzie@hotmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013

Purpose:

Limb fractures are amongst the most common reasons for presentation of children to the emergency department(ED) in Australia.  With injury comes pain; however many children do not receive timely analgesia despite national recommendations advocating analgesia within thirty minutes of triage. Timely analgesia is important in children as inappropriate or delayed management of pain can lead to emotional distress and contribute to heightened pain perception, causing anxiety, distress and anger during subsequent treatments. Painful experiences in hospital during childhood influence the child’s future health behaviours, manifesting in doctor phobias and avoidance of medical experiences and settings and contributing to poor health outcomes.

Project goals:

  1. To develop a nursing strategy to facilitate initiation of opioid analgesia at triage for children with suspected limb fracture and moderate to severe pain.
  2. To improve time to analgesia in children presenting to the emergency department with suspected limb fracture.

Methods:  

To facilitate nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl a policy was developed to guide nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl by triage nurses in the emergency department. Prior to implementation of this policy all triage competent nurses were required to complete a learning guide and competency.  Retrospective chart audits of all patients presenting with limb fractures provided a base line for time to analgesia in the selected patient group prior to implementation of nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl. A post implementation audit was then conducted to determine the impact of nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl on time to analgesia for children presenting with limb fractures.

Results:

 Nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl improves time to analgesia in children presenting to the emergency department with limb injury.

Conclusion:

Nurse initiated analgesia improves time to analgesia in children presenting to the ED and supports efficient patient flow.  The findings of this project supports further research in developing strategies for nurse initiated analgesia.

Keywords:
nurse initated; analgesia; triage
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Initiated Intranasal Fentanyl to Improve Time to Analgesia for Children Presenting to Emergency with Suspected Limb Fractureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Suzanneen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Williams, MNSc (NP), BN (Hons), Grad Cert Paed, Chld, Yth Hlth Nursing, Grad Cert Paed Crit Care Nursing, BHlthSc (Nursing), peterandsuzie@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304308-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>Limb fractures are amongst the most common reasons for presentation of children to the emergency department(ED) in Australia.  With injury comes pain; however many children do not receive timely analgesia despite national recommendations advocating analgesia within thirty minutes of triage. Timely analgesia is important in children as inappropriate or delayed management of pain can lead to emotional distress and contribute to heightened pain perception, causing anxiety, distress and anger during subsequent treatments. Painful experiences in hospital during childhood influence the child’s future health behaviours, manifesting in doctor phobias and avoidance of medical experiences and settings and contributing to poor health outcomes. <p>Project goals: <ol> <li>To develop a nursing strategy to facilitate initiation of opioid analgesia at triage for children with suspected limb fracture and moderate to severe pain.</li> <li>To improve time to analgesia in children presenting to the emergency department with suspected limb fracture.</li> </ol><p><b>Methods: </b>  <p>To facilitate nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl a policy was developed to guide nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl by triage nurses in the emergency department. Prior to implementation of this policy all triage competent nurses were required to complete a learning guide and competency.  Retrospective chart audits of all patients presenting with limb fractures provided a base line for time to analgesia in the selected patient group prior to implementation of nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl. A post implementation audit was then conducted to determine the impact of nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl on time to analgesia for children presenting with limb fractures.<b></b><p><b>Results: </b> <p> Nurse initiated intranasal fentanyl improves time to analgesia in children presenting to the emergency department with limb injury. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>Nurse initiated analgesia improves time to analgesia in children presenting to the ED and supports efficient patient flow.  The findings of this project supports further research in developing strategies for nurse initiated analgesia.en_GB
dc.subjectnurse initateden_GB
dc.subjectanalgesiaen_GB
dc.subjecttriageen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:33:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:33:15Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.