Observing Food-Eating Taboos as Nursing Practice: Nurses' Clinical Experience with Rituals in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304330
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Observing Food-Eating Taboos as Nursing Practice: Nurses' Clinical Experience with Rituals in Taiwan
Author(s):
Tsai, Shu-Ling; Hsu, Yu-Chien; Kao, Hsia-Tzu; Hsu, Min-Tao
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Shu-Ling Tsai, RN, MA, BS, doreen1229@gmail.com; Yu-Chien Hsu, MS, BS, RN; Hsia-Tzu Kao, BS, MSN, RN; Min-Tao Hsu, PhD, RN;
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, Monday, July 22, 2013

Purpose: This is a study on how a specific food-eating taboo observing act helps nurses adapt to clinical nursing practice and shape their understanding of nursing profession. Nursing can be viewed as a medical profession and a social behavior, and the following of nursing routines as out of professional demand and social coercion. Nonetheless, nurses do not restrict their rule-following act to the everyday nursing routines. They tend to tacitly observe a set of culturally imbedded taboos as well. In Taiwan, nurses do not eat pineapples, mangoes, among others, which may symbolize the clinical turmoil situations they try to avoid. How the ritualistic act is related to nursing profession and how it affects nurses’ adaptation to the clinical environment are the main objectives of this study.

Methods: In this qualitative study, 10 nurse participants in Taiwan were recruited for depth-interviews. Hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis was applied to identify and categorize participants’ responses to the interview questions. The researchers analyzed the text by focusing on the following issues: (1) disclosing the fore-structure of understanding, (2) reflecting on the essential themes, which characterize the phenomenon, (3) balancing the research context by considering parts and whole, (4) discovering the essential modes of involvement.

Results: Four themes of nurses’ experiences of food-eating taboos observing were identified: 1. a variety of food-eating taboos observing acts, 2. subduing anxiety at work, 3. participating in a nurse community, 4. ritual-observing as part of profession.

Conclusion: Nurses have no conflict in intertwining the ritualistic taboo-observing act with their professional routine work. Not only does this ritualistic act help them avoid the undesirable clinical situations they perceive, it also facilitates them blending into the nursing community effectively. Nursing profession should be understood in a broader culture context as a social group with special task.

Keywords:
hermeneutic-phenomenology; taboo-observing; nursing ritual
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleObserving Food-Eating Taboos as Nursing Practice: Nurses' Clinical Experience with Rituals in Taiwanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Shu-Lingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Yu-Chienen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKao, Hsia-Tzuen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Min-Taoen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsShu-Ling Tsai, RN, MA, BS, doreen1229@gmail.com; Yu-Chien Hsu, MS, BS, RN; Hsia-Tzu Kao, BS, MSN, RN; Min-Tao Hsu, PhD, RN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304330-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, Monday, July 22, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>This is a study on how a specific food-eating taboo observing act helps nurses adapt to clinical nursing practice and shape their understanding of nursing profession. Nursing can be viewed as a medical profession and a social behavior, and the following of nursing routines as out of professional demand and social coercion. Nonetheless, nurses do not restrict their rule-following act to the everyday nursing routines. They tend to tacitly observe a set of culturally imbedded taboos as well. In Taiwan, nurses do not eat pineapples, mangoes, among others, which may symbolize the clinical turmoil situations they try to avoid. How the ritualistic act is related to nursing profession and how it affects nurses’ adaptation to the clinical environment are the main objectives of this study. <p><b>Methods: </b>In this qualitative study, 10 nurse participants in Taiwan were recruited for depth-interviews. Hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis was applied to identify and categorize participants’ responses to the interview questions. The researchers analyzed the text by focusing on the following issues: (1) disclosing the fore-structure of understanding, (2) reflecting on the essential themes, which characterize the phenomenon, (3) balancing the research context by considering parts and whole, (4) discovering the essential modes of involvement. <p><b>Results: </b>Four themes of nurses’ experiences of food-eating taboos observing were identified: 1. a variety of food-eating taboos observing acts, 2. subduing anxiety at work, 3. participating in a nurse community, 4. ritual-observing as part of profession.<b></b><p><b>Conclusion: </b>Nurses have no conflict in intertwining the ritualistic taboo-observing act with their professional routine work. Not only does this ritualistic act help them avoid the undesirable clinical situations they perceive, it also facilitates them blending into the nursing community effectively. Nursing profession should be understood in a broader culture context as a social group with special task.en_GB
dc.subjecthermeneutic-phenomenologyen_GB
dc.subjecttaboo-observingen_GB
dc.subjectnursing ritualen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:33:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:33:40Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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