The Effectiveness of Sleeping Time and Episodes of Apnea on Preterm Infants in the Prone Position

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304333
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of Sleeping Time and Episodes of Apnea on Preterm Infants in the Prone Position
Author(s):
Chen, Yong-Chuan; Liang, Hwey-Fang; Hou, Hui-Ming; Chen, Juei-Chao; Chiang, Li-Chi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta
Author Details:
Yong-Chuan Chen, RN, yongchuan72@gmail.com; Hwey-Fang Liang, PhD, RN; Hui-Ming Hou, RN, MS; Juei-Chao Chen, PhD; Li-Chi Chiang, RN, PhD;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: In the last few years, the prone position has been widely used in mechanically ventilated preterm infants to stabilize heart rate, respiration and improve oxygen saturation. So, this study was to investigate the effectiveness of sleeping time and episodes of apnea on preterm infants in the prone position. 

Methods: This study used a quasi-experimental with crossover design. Preterm infants recruited for this study were all at a gestational age of 26 to 36 weeks, a postnatal age of 10 or fewer days, and free of congenital abnormalities or sedation. A total of 28 participants were assigned at random to a supine-then-prone or prone-then-supine position sequence. At each position was two to three hours. During this protocol, ventilator and incubator settings remained unchanged, infants didn’t receive any invasive therapy. We took measurements at two hours after supine or prone position. Sleeping time and episodes of apnea were recorded by a Drager monitor. Data were statistically analyzed with independent t-test.

Results:  Infants in the prone compared to supine position had increased sleeping time (p< .01) and decreased episodes of apnea (p< .01).

Conclusion: Evidence supports nurses practicing a prone position for preterm infants to increase sleeping time and decrease episodes of apnea. Thus, energy can be stored through body weight gain and hypoxia may be minimized.

Keywords:
position; sleeping time; preterm infants
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Sleeping Time and Episodes of Apnea on Preterm Infants in the Prone Positionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yong-Chuanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Hwey-Fangen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHou, Hui-Mingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChen, Juei-Chaoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Li-Chien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsYong-Chuan Chen, RN, yongchuan72@gmail.com; Hwey-Fang Liang, PhD, RN; Hui-Ming Hou, RN, MS; Juei-Chao Chen, PhD; Li-Chi Chiang, RN, PhD;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304333-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>In the last few years, the prone position has been widely used in mechanically ventilated preterm infants to stabilize heart rate, respiration and improve oxygen saturation. So, this study was to investigate the effectiveness of sleeping time and episodes of apnea on preterm infants in the prone position.  <p><b>Methods: </b>This study used a quasi-experimental with crossover design. Preterm infants recruited for this study were all at a gestational age of 26 to 36 weeks, a postnatal age of 10 or fewer days, and free of congenital abnormalities or sedation. A total of 28 participants were assigned at random to a supine-then-prone or prone-then-supine position sequence. At each position was two to three hours. During this protocol, ventilator and incubator settings remained unchanged, infants didn’t receive any invasive therapy. We took measurements at two hours after supine or prone position. Sleeping time and episodes of apnea were recorded by a Drager monitor. Data were statistically analyzed with independent t-test. <p><b>Results: </b> Infants in the prone compared to supine position had increased sleeping time (p< .01) and decreased episodes of apnea (p< .01). <p><b>Conclusion: </b>Evidence supports nurses practicing a prone position for preterm infants to increase sleeping time and decrease episodes of apnea. Thus, energy can be stored through body weight gain and hypoxia may be minimized.en_GB
dc.subjectpositionen_GB
dc.subjectsleeping timeen_GB
dc.subjectpreterm infantsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:33:45Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:33:45Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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