Key Differences Over Time Between Associate's Degree and Bachelor's Degree Graduates: Quality Improvement Preparedness, Mobility, and Achieving Advanced Degrees

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304359
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Key Differences Over Time Between Associate's Degree and Bachelor's Degree Graduates: Quality Improvement Preparedness, Mobility, and Achieving Advanced Degrees
Author(s):
Brewer, Carol S.; Kovner, Christine T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Kappa
Author Details:
Carol S. Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN, csbrewer@buffalo.edu; Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to summarize our longitudinal study findings related to RN education on RN characteristics, mobility, quality improvement (QI) preparedness and achieving advanced degrees among newly licensed RNs (NLRN) who have been followed from 2006 to 2011.

Methods: This is a longitudinal, multi-state study with nationally representative sample. The initial survey (Wave 1) enrolled a sample of 3370 initially. Respondents to this survey were sent surveys in 2007 (Wave 2, n=2,386), 2009 (Wave 3, n= 2,007), and 2011 (Wave 4, n= 1,544).

Results: In one study we examined the characteristics which affected degree completion including race, previous employment, geographical area, time of shift, and parental education.  RNs with Bachelor’s degrees (BS) were more likely to work in hospitals and were also more likely to work in direct care within 6-18 months of graduation. In another study BS graduates reported feeling significantly better prepared than associate degree (AD) graduates in quality improvement knowledge and skills but there was no significant differences of reported participation in hospital QI activities.  Another study showed that NLRNs seem to have limited geographical mobility. Approximately 79% of NLRNs attended a nursing degree program in the state in which they graduated high school, and 88% took their first nursing job in that state.  The median distance between degree program and high school was 31.6 miles and to eventual workplace was 21.3 miles. AD RNs were more likely to get their degree and work near where they attended high school.

Conclusion: There are important differences between AD and BS NLRNs. Recommendations for encouraging additional formal education and higher degrees include making a return to school easier, more efficient, and more affordable; including internet-based and worksite classes to help with scheduling conflicts; and employing mentorship models for academic-clinical partnerships.

Keywords:
Newly licensed RNs; RN education; Longitudinal study
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKey Differences Over Time Between Associate's Degree and Bachelor's Degree Graduates: Quality Improvement Preparedness, Mobility, and Achieving Advanced Degreesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrewer, Carol S.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKovner, Christine T.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Kappaen_GB
dc.author.detailsCarol S. Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN, csbrewer@buffalo.edu; Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304359-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>The purpose of this presentation is to summarize our longitudinal study findings related to RN education on RN characteristics, mobility, quality improvement (QI) preparedness and achieving advanced degrees among newly licensed RNs (NLRN) who have been followed from 2006 to 2011. <p><b>Methods:</b> This is a longitudinal, multi-state study with nationally representative sample. The initial survey (Wave 1) enrolled a sample of 3370 initially. Respondents to this survey were sent surveys in 2007 (Wave 2, n=2,386), 2009 (Wave 3, n= 2,007), and 2011 (Wave 4, n= 1,544). <p><b>Results</b>: In one study we examined the characteristics which affected degree completion including race, previous employment, geographical area, time of shift, and parental education.  RNs with Bachelor’s degrees (BS) were more likely to work in hospitals and were also more likely to work in direct care within 6-18 months of graduation. In another study BS graduates reported feeling significantly better prepared than associate degree (AD) graduates in quality improvement knowledge and skills but there was no significant differences of reported participation in hospital QI activities.  Another study showed that NLRNs seem to have limited geographical mobility. Approximately 79% of NLRNs attended a nursing degree program in the state in which they graduated high school, and 88% took their first nursing job in that state.  The median distance between degree program and high school was 31.6 miles and to eventual workplace was 21.3 miles. AD RNs were more likely to get their degree and work near where they attended high school. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>There are important differences between AD and BS NLRNs. Recommendations for encouraging additional formal education and higher degrees include making a return to school easier, more efficient, and more affordable; including internet-based and worksite classes to help with scheduling conflicts; and employing mentorship models for academic-clinical partnerships.en_GB
dc.subjectNewly licensed RNsen_GB
dc.subjectRN educationen_GB
dc.subjectLongitudinal studyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:34:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:34:20Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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