2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304422
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborations in Faculty Development: An ELITE Experience
Author(s):
Burns, Helen K.; Talcott, Kimberly; O'Donnell, John M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Helen K. Burns, PhD, RN, FAAN, burnsh@pitt.edu; Kimberly Talcott, MPA; John M. O'Donnell, RN, CRNA, MSN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose:

The Emerging Learning and Integrated Technologies Education (ELITE) Faculty Development Program trains nurse educators in the use of technology for nursing education and practice.  The ELITE Program’s face-to-face and online workshops accelerate educator’s skill acquisition and technology integration into the nursing curriculum. 

Methods:

A nation-wide collaboration of technology experts from five national institutions develop workshop content and practice opportunities for nurse educators based on best-evidence in technology research and practice.  The collaborators are experts in one of five areas:  learning technologies, telehealth, distance education, nursing informatics, and simulation. 

Results:

Since 2007, the ELITE workshops trained over 450 nurse educators from 62 institutions potentially impacting 224,550 students.  The Program distributed over 4,900 continuing education units through 29 workshops.  Participants completed assessment instruments prior to the ELITE Program’s workshops. Nurse educators (n=167) responded on a 1-5 Likert scale, 5 as highest, that their interest (overall mean 4.21) in using technology in teaching was higher than their frequency of use (2.97) or confidence in use (2.89).  When comparing the five technology focus areas, classroom technologies had the highest overall perception of interest, frequency of use, and confidence (4.06) and telehealth technologies had the lowest (2.44).  Nurse educators strongly agreed that technology can decision making (68%, n=83) and develop clinical skills (63%, n=77).  Responses less robust when asked if respondents are prepared to use learning technologies in their teaching (36%, n=44 strongly agreed) or if faculty support for use of technology was adequate (11%, n=14 strongly agreed).   

Conclusion:

The ELITE Program expanded the capacity of nursing schools to educate students for the 21st century healthcare practice by addressing two gaps in nursing education:  1) the technology gap between today’s nurse educators and their tech-savvy students and 2) the research and practice gap by providing opportunities for hands-on technology practice through continuing education workshops.

Keywords:
Technology; Collaboration; Faculty Development
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborations in Faculty Development: An ELITE Experienceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Helen K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTalcott, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, John M.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsHelen K. Burns, PhD, RN, FAAN, burnsh@pitt.edu; Kimberly Talcott, MPA; John M. O'Donnell, RN, CRNA, MSN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304422-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>The Emerging Learning and Integrated Technologies Education (ELITE) Faculty Development Program trains nurse educators in the use of technology for nursing education and practice.  The ELITE Program’s face-to-face and online workshops accelerate educator’s skill acquisition and technology integration into the nursing curriculum.  <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>A nation-wide collaboration of technology experts from five national institutions develop workshop content and practice opportunities for nurse educators based on best-evidence in technology research and practice.  The collaborators are experts in one of five areas:  learning technologies, telehealth, distance education, nursing informatics, and simulation.  <p><b>Results: </b> <p>Since 2007, the ELITE workshops trained over 450 nurse educators from 62 institutions potentially impacting 224,550 students.  The Program distributed over 4,900 continuing education units through 29 workshops.  Participants completed assessment instruments prior to the ELITE Program’s workshops. Nurse educators (n=167) responded on a 1-5 Likert scale, 5 as highest, that their interest (overall mean 4.21) in using technology in teaching was higher than their frequency of use (2.97) or confidence in use (2.89).  When comparing the five technology focus areas, classroom technologies had the highest overall perception of interest, frequency of use, and confidence (4.06) and telehealth technologies had the lowest (2.44).  Nurse educators strongly agreed that technology can decision making (68%, n=83) and develop clinical skills (63%, n=77).  Responses less robust when asked if respondents are prepared to use learning technologies in their teaching (36%, n=44 strongly agreed) or if faculty support for use of technology was adequate (11%, n=14 strongly agreed).    <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>The ELITE Program expanded the capacity of nursing schools to educate students for the 21<sup>st</sup> century healthcare practice by addressing two gaps in nursing education:  1) the technology gap between today’s nurse educators and their tech-savvy students and 2) the research and practice gap by providing opportunities for hands-on technology practice through continuing education workshops.en_GB
dc.subjectTechnologyen_GB
dc.subjectCollaborationen_GB
dc.subjectFaculty Developmenten_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:35:32Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:35:32Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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