2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304429
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adapting Interventions to Diverse Populations
Author(s):
Menon, Usha
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Usha Menon, PhD, RN, FAAN, umenon@con.ohio-state.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: Interventions to promote health and health behavior change in minority/ immigrant communities have been developed primarily from Western cultural perspectives. With the surge in research addressing underserved population outcomes, interventions have been adapted for these diverse population groups with inconsistent results. When individuals are asymptomatic, and combined with beliefs about health that are embedded in cultural and spiritual mores, stimulating behavior change is challenging. In this presentation, we describe methods of adapting interventions to minority/immigrant communities.

Methods: Using the social determinants of health model, three levels of health determinants are identified: proximal, intermediate, and distal, which encompass a wide range of variables from individual beliefs to health care system issues. Culture, race/ethnicity, and gender are interwoven into each level of determinant, often impacting how an individual reacts or adapts behavior.

Results: Types of health interventions—standardized, targeted and tailored are described, and factors that impact the design and adaptation of interventions (cost, delivery method, outcome of interest, expected or known variance in attributes to be manipulated, setting, etc.) are defined. Using exemplars from cancer screening and cardiovascular disease risk reduction, a decision model is presented for designing interventions.

Conclusions: A culturally-based intervention that only incorporates language or traditional beliefs cannot change health behavior. Researchers must proactively identify areas where a cultural intervention can improve behaviors, and actively implement the solution leveraging cultural practices, products, philosophies, or environments as vehicles that facilitate behavior change of patients and practitioners. Although, time-intensive and requiring rigorous formative research, this process will lead to enhanced and sustainable health interventions.

Keywords:
social determinants of health; behavioral health interventions; designing interventions
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdapting Interventions to Diverse Populationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMenon, Ushaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen_GB
dc.author.detailsUsha Menon, PhD, RN, FAAN, umenon@con.ohio-state.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304429-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b><b>Purpose: </b></b> Interventions to promote health and health behavior change in minority/ immigrant communities have been developed primarily from Western cultural perspectives. With the surge in research addressing underserved population outcomes, interventions have been adapted for these diverse population groups with inconsistent results. When individuals are asymptomatic, and combined with beliefs about health that are embedded in cultural and spiritual mores, stimulating behavior change is challenging. In this presentation, we describe methods of adapting interventions to minority/immigrant communities. <p><b><b>Methods: </b></b> Using the social determinants of health model, three levels of health determinants are identified: proximal, intermediate, and distal, which encompass a wide range of variables from individual beliefs to health care system issues. Culture, race/ethnicity, and gender are interwoven into each level of determinant, often impacting how an individual reacts or adapts behavior. <p><b><b>Results: </b> </b>Types of health interventions—standardized, targeted and tailored are described, and factors that impact the design and adaptation of interventions (cost, delivery method, outcome of interest, expected or known variance in attributes to be manipulated, setting, etc.) are defined. Using exemplars from cancer screening and cardiovascular disease risk reduction, a decision model is presented for designing interventions. <p><b><b>Conclusions</b>: </b> A culturally-based intervention that only incorporates language or traditional beliefs cannot change health behavior. Researchers must proactively identify areas where a cultural intervention can improve behaviors, and actively implement the solution leveraging cultural practices, products, philosophies, or environments as vehicles that facilitate behavior change of patients and practitioners. Although, time-intensive and requiring rigorous formative research, this process will lead to enhanced and sustainable health interventions.en_GB
dc.subjectsocial determinants of healthen_GB
dc.subjectbehavioral health interventionsen_GB
dc.subjectdesigning interventionsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:35:41Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:35:41Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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