2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304439
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Racial/Cultural Pride in African-American Middle School-Age Girls
Author(s):
Bartlett, Robin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Zeta
Author Details:
Robin Bartlett, PhD, RN, robin_bartlett@uncg.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013

Purpose: Building racial/cultural pride in African American middle school age girls has been found to be useful in reducing their risky sex behaviors. This study was designed using a risk and protective factors conceptual framework. The purpose of this report is to describe strategies for building racial/cultural pride in African American middle school age girls as a way to help these girls avoid behaviors that put them at risk for contracting HIV.

Methods: After IRB approval, using convenience and other sampling strategies, African American college enrolled young women, mothers and then fathers were recruited for participation in three focus groups. After consenting participants, open-ended questions were posed including “What strategies would you recommend to help build girls’ racial/cultural pride”. Groups were audiotaped and tapes transcribed. Content analysis was performed on the transcripts.

Results: Twenty-three participants were included in the three focus groups. Strategies recommended included promoting the girls’ self-esteem, addressing different shades of skin color because that is “related to how they feel inside”, addressing stereotypes about African American women, having the girls do research about their race and ancestry, providing positive views of their culture and of members of their same race, and promoting engagement of the fathers with daughters.

Conclusion: Racial/cultural pride may be protective for African American girls in terms of risky sex behaviors. Strategies for building racial/cultural pride can be implemented in risky sex prevention interventions with African American middle school age girls.

Keywords:
Racial/cultural Pride; African American; Middle School Age Girls
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Racial/Cultural Pride in African-American Middle School-Age Girlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Robinen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Zetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsRobin Bartlett, PhD, RN, robin_bartlett@uncg.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304439-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> Building racial/cultural pride in African American middle school age girls has been found to be useful in reducing their risky sex behaviors. This study was designed using a risk and protective factors conceptual framework. The purpose of this report is to describe strategies for building racial/cultural pride in African American middle school age girls as a way to help these girls avoid behaviors that put them at risk for contracting HIV. <p><b>Methods: </b> After IRB approval, using convenience and other sampling strategies, African American college enrolled young women, mothers and then fathers were recruited for participation in three focus groups. After consenting participants, open-ended questions were posed including “What strategies would you recommend to help build girls’ racial/cultural pride”. Groups were audiotaped and tapes transcribed. Content analysis was performed on the transcripts. <p><b>Results: </b> Twenty-three participants were included in the three focus groups. Strategies recommended included promoting the girls’ self-esteem, addressing different shades of skin color because that is “related to how they feel inside”, addressing stereotypes about African American women, having the girls do research about their race and ancestry, providing positive views of their culture and of members of their same race, and promoting engagement of the fathers with daughters. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Racial/cultural pride may be protective for African American girls in terms of risky sex behaviors. Strategies for building racial/cultural pride can be implemented in risky sex prevention interventions with African American middle school age girls.en_GB
dc.subjectRacial/cultural Prideen_GB
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen_GB
dc.subjectMiddle School Age Girlsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:35:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:35:51Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.