Complementary/Integrative Approaches to Treating "The Invisible Wounds of War:" Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304444
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary/Integrative Approaches to Treating "The Invisible Wounds of War:" Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
Author(s):
St. Pierre, Cathy M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Chi
Author Details:
Cathy M. St. Pierre, PhD, APRN, FNP, FAANP, saintlydoc@aol.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013

Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to discuss current approaches to screening, diagnosis and management of both TBI and PTSD. 'Treatment including traditional and complementary evidence based approaches will be discussed.

Methods: Review of the literature and research studies, expertise in subject content.

Results:

' The recent war conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have created new health problems for many of the soldiers and veterans.' Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) have become known as the 'invisible wounds of war' because there are no outward signs of these diseases.' Currently, there are over 300,00 or 20% of 'veterans 'who served in Iraq or Afghanistan diagnosed with PTSD.' The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center(2012) currently estimates that approximately' 230,000 military personnel have been diagnosed with TBI. 'TBI is classified into three categories: Mild, Moderate and Severe. 'Although veterans diagnosed with Severe TBI are often easily identified physically, the majority of the cases (77%) of' TBI are considered mild and display no visible wounds.' The long term sequelae for both of these diseases, can be devastating to both veterans and their families. 'To complicate matters, some 'veterans diagnosed with TBI, also have PTSD, so the impact can be a 'double whammy'.' 'The financial burden of care related to the costs of these two diagnoses' reaches approximately $916 billion dollars per year (2008).

Conclusion:

Emerging research is demonstrating 'positive effects and improvement in quality of life factors in the utilization of various complementary modalities to treat treating PTSD and TBI.

Keywords:
PTSD; TBI; Complementary
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleComplementary/Integrative Approaches to Treating "The Invisible Wounds of War:" Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)en
dc.contributor.authorSt. Pierre, Cathy M.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Chien
dc.author.detailsCathy M. St. Pierre, PhD, APRN, FNP, FAANP, saintlydoc@aol.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304444-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, July 26, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>The purpose of this presentation is to discuss current approaches to screening, diagnosis and management of both TBI and PTSD. 'Treatment including traditional and complementary evidence based approaches will be discussed. <p><b>Methods: </b>Review of the literature and research studies, expertise in subject content. <p><b>Results: </b> <p><span>' The recent war conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have created new health problems for many of the soldiers and veterans.' Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) have become known as the 'invisible wounds of war' because there are no outward signs of these diseases.' Currently, there are over 300,00 or 20% of 'veterans 'who served in Iraq or Afghanistan diagnosed with PTSD.' The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center(2012) currently estimates that approximately' 230,000 military personnel have been diagnosed with TBI. 'TBI is classified into three categories: Mild, Moderate and Severe. 'Although veterans diagnosed with Severe TBI are often easily identified physically, the majority of the cases (77%) of' TBI are considered mild and display no visible wounds.' The long term sequelae for both of these diseases, can be devastating to both veterans and their families. 'To complicate matters, some 'veterans diagnosed with TBI, also have PTSD, so the impact can be a 'double whammy'.' 'The financial burden of care related to the costs of these two diagnoses' reaches approximately $916 billion dollars per year (2008). </span><p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>Emerging research is demonstrating 'positive effects and improvement in quality of life factors in the utilization of various complementary modalities to treat treating PTSD and TBI.en
dc.subjectPTSDen
dc.subjectTBIen
dc.subjectComplementaryen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:35:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:35:57Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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