Using the Rasch Measurement Model in Psychometric Analysis of the Family Effectiveness Measure (FEM)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304453
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using the Rasch Measurement Model in Psychometric Analysis of the Family Effectiveness Measure (FEM)
Author(s):
McCreary, Linda L.; Scott, Christy K.; Dennis, Michael L.; Conrad, Kendon J.; Funk, Rodney R.; Conrad, Karen M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Linda L. McCreary, PhD, RN, mccreary@uic.edu; Christy K. Scott, PhD; Michael L. Dennis, PhD; Kendon J. Conrad, PhD; Rodney R. Funk, BS; Karen M. Conrad, PhD, RN;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013

Purpose: Existing measures, developed primarily with mainstream American families, may not validly assess family functioning in other populations. Guided by the Rasch measurement model and classical test theory, this study was conducted to assess psychometric properties of the Family Effectiveness Measure (FEM), developed with low-income African-American single-parent families, and to make refinements based on results.

Methods: A convenience sample of 607 predominantly unmarried, low-income African American adult women participated. A cross-sectional design using Rasch analysis assessed unidimensionality, response category functioning, item fit, person reliability, differential item functioning (DIF) by race and parental status, and item hierarchy. Criterion-related validity was tested using correlations with five variables related to family functioning.

Results: The original 42-item FEM measures family effectiveness with both positive and negative (reverse-scored) items. Rasch analysis suggested that the original FEM actually measures two separate constructs: effective (EFF) and ineffective family functioning (IFF). The 20-item EFF was shown to be a psychometrically sound measure, made more efficient by deleting 22 items (6 misfitting effective family items and 16 ineffective family items). The IFF, consisting of the 16 ineffective family items, was less psychometrically strong. A weak, negative correlation between the EFF and IFF supported existence of two constructs. Collapsing the 5-point Likert-scale response categories into a 4-point scale optimized response category functioning. Both EFF and IFF evidenced good reliability and strong criterion-related validity. Neither EFF nor IFF showed DIF by race; one IFF item showed DIF by parental status.

Conclusion: In contrast to the prevailing conceptualization of family functioning as a single construct assessed by positive and negative items, Rasch analysis suggested the existence of two separate constructs: effectiveness and ineffectiveness. While the EFF is a strong, efficient measure of family functioning, the IFF requires additional development and testing. Rasch analysis provided important information that strengthens measurement of family functioning.

Keywords:
Rasch; measurement; family functioning
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing the Rasch Measurement Model in Psychometric Analysis of the Family Effectiveness Measure (FEM)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCreary, Linda L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorScott, Christy K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDennis, Michael L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorConrad, Kendon J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFunk, Rodney R.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorConrad, Karen M.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsLinda L. McCreary, PhD, RN, mccreary@uic.edu; Christy K. Scott, PhD; Michael L. Dennis, PhD; Kendon J. Conrad, PhD; Rodney R. Funk, BS; Karen M. Conrad, PhD, RN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304453-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Thursday, July 25, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>Existing measures, developed primarily with mainstream American families, may not validly assess family functioning in other populations. Guided by the Rasch measurement model and classical test theory, this study was conducted to assess psychometric properties of the Family Effectiveness Measure (FEM), developed with low-income African-American single-parent families, and to make refinements based on results. <p><b>Methods: </b>A convenience sample of 607 predominantly unmarried, low-income African American adult women participated. A cross-sectional design using Rasch analysis assessed unidimensionality, response category functioning, item fit, person reliability, differential item functioning (DIF) by race and parental status, and item hierarchy. Criterion-related validity was tested using correlations with five variables related to family functioning. <p><b>Results: </b>The original 42-item FEM measures family effectiveness with both positive and negative (reverse-scored) items.<b> </b>Rasch analysis suggested that the original FEM actually measures two separate constructs: effective (EFF) and ineffective family functioning (IFF). The 20-item EFF was shown to be a psychometrically sound measure, made more efficient by deleting 22 items (6 misfitting effective family items and 16 ineffective family items). The IFF, consisting of the 16 ineffective family items, was less psychometrically strong. A weak, negative correlation between the EFF and IFF supported existence of two constructs. Collapsing the 5-point Likert-scale response categories into a 4-point scale optimized response category functioning. Both EFF and IFF evidenced good reliability and strong criterion-related validity. Neither EFF nor IFF showed DIF by race; one IFF item showed DIF by parental status. <p><b>Conclusion: </b>In contrast to the prevailing conceptualization of family functioning as a single construct assessed by positive and negative items, Rasch analysis suggested the existence of two separate constructs: effectiveness and ineffectiveness. While the EFF is a strong, efficient measure of family functioning, the IFF requires additional development and testing. Rasch analysis provided important information that strengthens measurement of family functioning.en_GB
dc.subjectRaschen_GB
dc.subjectmeasurementen_GB
dc.subjectfamily functioningen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:36:11Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:36:11Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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