Building Partnership: A Descriptive Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as a Community-Centric Approach to Public Health Challenges in Rural Limpopo Province

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304469
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Partnership: A Descriptive Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as a Community-Centric Approach to Public Health Challenges in Rural Limpopo Province
Author(s):
Thompson Heisterman, Anita
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Kappa
Author Details:
Anita Thompson Heisterman, MSN, RN, PMHCNS, BC, PMHNP, BC, aat8a@virginia.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, Monday, July 22, 2013

Purpose:

An investigation was conducted to determine if an Appreciative Inquiry (AI) approach to community needs assessment would enhance participation and capacity to manage limited water and health resources in partner villages. The project was part of the Water and Health in Limpopo (WHIL) partnership, a multidisciplinary sustained effort to improve water quality and health outcomes of people of Limpopo Province, South Africa.  Each year faculty- student teams from an American and a South African University collaborate on mutually determined projects. Continuing assessment of stakeholder’s needs and priorities is an essential component of sustaining the partnership.

Methods:

Appreciative Inquiry is a method of assessing community focused on the strengths of a community and based on observations that people create shared  environments, systems and beliefs together. Shared positive images result in creative and constructive outcomes.  Using the AI process, discussion questions  were developed to foster discovery of community strengths, share dreams of the   ideal village and design the envisioned community.  Nine self selected groups of villagers met with facilitators from the core AI student-faculty team. Field notes were taken during the group sessions to capture information. Each group identified 3 priority projects, then met to share outcomes, reach consensus and make plans.  Group spokespersons were asked to complete a 2 question survey regarding if they felt listened to and more confident about implementing projects. Additional comments were encouraged.

Results:

 The AI process highlighted capacity and fostered shared solutions to water and health challenges as evidenced by level of participation, number of projects identified and ability to reach consensus and formulate plans. All nine group  leaders felt listened to and seven of nine had increased confidence in capacity for implementation and all provided comments.

Conclusion:

 Appreciative Inquiry may be a viable method in public health nursing to recognize community capacity, build partnership and implement shared solutions to health challenges

Keywords:
Appreciative Inquiry; Partnership; Public health
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Partnership: A Descriptive Analysis of Appreciative Inquiry as a Community-Centric Approach to Public Health Challenges in Rural Limpopo Provinceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThompson Heisterman, Anitaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Kappaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnita Thompson Heisterman, MSN, RN, PMHCNS, BC, PMHNP, BC, aat8a@virginia.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304469-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013, Monday, July 22, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p class="ListParagraph">An investigation was conducted to determine if an Appreciative Inquiry (AI) approach to community needs assessment would enhance participation and capacity to manage limited water and health resources in partner villages. The project was part of the Water and Health in Limpopo (WHIL) partnership, a multidisciplinary sustained effort to improve water quality and health outcomes of people of Limpopo Province, South Africa.  Each year faculty- student teams from an American and a South African University collaborate on mutually determined projects. Continuing assessment of stakeholder’s needs and priorities is an essential component of sustaining the partnership. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>Appreciative Inquiry is a method of assessing community focused on the strengths of a community and based on observations that people create shared  environments, systems and beliefs together. Shared positive images result in creative and constructive outcomes.  Using the AI process, discussion questions  were developed to foster discovery of community strengths, share dreams of the   ideal village and design the envisioned community.  Nine self selected groups of villagers met with facilitators from the core AI student-faculty team. Field notes were taken during the group sessions to capture information. Each group identified 3 priority projects, then met to share outcomes, reach consensus and make plans.  Group spokespersons were asked to complete a 2 question survey regarding if they felt listened to and more confident about implementing projects. Additional comments were encouraged. <p><b>Results: </b> <p> The AI process highlighted capacity and fostered shared solutions to water and health challenges as evidenced by level of participation, number of projects identified and ability to reach consensus and formulate plans. All nine group  leaders felt listened to and seven of nine had increased confidence in capacity for implementation and all provided comments. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p><b></b> Appreciative Inquiry may be a viable method in public health nursing to recognize community capacity, build partnership and implement shared solutions to health challengesen_GB
dc.subjectAppreciative Inquiryen_GB
dc.subjectPartnershipen_GB
dc.subjectPublic healthen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:36:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:36:39Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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