Women are Different!: Gender Specific Protocols for Treatment of Hypertension

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304491
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women are Different!: Gender Specific Protocols for Treatment of Hypertension
Author(s):
Whiffen, Rebecca J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Theta
Author Details:
Rebecca J. Whiffen, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC, rwhiffen@sehealth.org
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose

This study has dual, complementing purposes: first, a comprehensive literature review of reported gender, race, age and menopausal status variables in the treatment of hypertension in women, and second, an evaluation of hypertension treatment for best practices.' These data were then compiled and utilized to propose a gender specific protocol for treatment of hypertension.

Method

A retrospective chart review of 100 women with the diagnosis of benign hypertension was performed in a large cardiovascular practice.''Patient charts were reviewed to identify the antihypertensive medications currently in use, and the data were compared for best practices by using the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) (Chobanian, 2003), and The Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women 2011 Update (Mosca, 2011).

Results

When evaluating the evidence for' best practices, these data show that out of the 100 women, 76% were found to have controlled hypertension (BP < 140/90), as compared to the national rate of 64% (CDC, 2005). 'The'most common'medications used in this practice were Beta Blockers, ACE Inhibitors, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers, Calcium Channel Blockers, Alpha Blockers and Diuretics.' Out of the 33 women who had the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM), 54% were on an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), as recommended by JNC 7(Chobanian, 2003).' Gender specific protocols were developed using these data as well as the research material.

Conclusion

The protocols developed are gender specific, with recommendations for the variables of age, race, menopausal status, and presence of co-morbidities.' These protocols could easily streamline a treatment plan for new practitioners and also give women a voice in what current evidence shows is best practice in the treatment of hypertension.

Keywords:
hypertension; protocols; women
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleWomen are Different!: Gender Specific Protocols for Treatment of Hypertensionen
dc.contributor.authorWhiffen, Rebecca J.en
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Thetaen
dc.author.detailsRebecca J. Whiffen, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, ACNP-BC, rwhiffen@sehealth.orgen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304491-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><p>Purpose <p>This study has dual, complementing purposes: first, a comprehensive literature review of reported gender, race, age and menopausal status variables in the treatment of hypertension in women, and second, an evaluation of hypertension treatment for best practices.' These data were then compiled and utilized to propose a gender specific protocol for treatment of hypertension. <p>Method <p>A retrospective chart review of 100 women with the diagnosis of benign hypertension was performed in a large cardiovascular practice.''Patient charts were reviewed to identify the antihypertensive medications currently in use, and the data were compared for best practices by using the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) (Chobanian, 2003), and The Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women 2011 Update (Mosca, 2011). <p>Results <p>When evaluating the evidence for' best practices, these data show that out of the 100 women, 76% were found to have controlled hypertension (BP < 140/90), as compared to the national rate of 64% (CDC, 2005). 'The'most common'medications used in this practice were Beta Blockers, ACE Inhibitors, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers, Calcium Channel Blockers, Alpha Blockers and Diuretics.' Out of the 33 women who had the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM), 54% were on an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), as recommended by JNC 7(Chobanian, 2003).' Gender specific protocols were developed using these data as well as the research material. <p>Conclusion <p>The protocols developed are gender specific, with recommendations for the variables of age, race, menopausal status, and presence of co-morbidities.' These protocols could easily streamline a treatment plan for new practitioners and also give women a voice in what current evidence shows is best practice in the treatment of hypertension.en
dc.subjecthypertensionen
dc.subjectprotocolsen
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:37:12Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:37:12Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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