Assessing Scientific Writing from Concept to Implementation in a Graduate Curriculum

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304501
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Scientific Writing from Concept to Implementation in a Graduate Curriculum
Author(s):
Evers-Manly, Shirley D.; Smith, Bruce
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Shirley D. Evers-Manly, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, shirleymanlylampkin@cdrewu.edu; Bruce Smith, MA, ELS, Instructor;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Purpose: Historically, nursing school admissions requirements have incorporated an assumption that students arrive on campus proficient in scientific writing. However, once engaged in coursework, many students find that scientific writing is challenging, requiring unaccustomed degrees of accuracy, clarity, and concision and replete with unfamiliar conventions. Meanwhile, professors may feel overwhelmed by excessive time consumed in accommodating to student writing deficiencies. Consequently, nursing educators have two needs: first, the need for a reliable diagnostic instrument that effectively assesses writing proficiency and identifies students who need intervention, and second, interventions that effectively improve students’ writing proficiency.

Methods: From 2010 through 2012, UCSF School of Nursing (SON) developed a series of scientific writing diagnostic tools that were administered to 559 graduate students.

Results:

In the 2010 assessment, master’s students wrote compositions that were subsequently evaluated for basic writing errors; 87% of compositions were determined to be substandard for successful engagement in graduate study, and composition scores indicated that 49% of student–authors were in need of intervention. In the 2011 assessment, students completed a 40-question (multiple-choice) test on APA Style and edited three paragraphs adapted from nursing journal articles; the paragraphs contained 113 errors. The mean score on the APA Style test was 60% correct; the mean score on the paragraph editing test was only 19% correct. The editing test was a stronger indicator of student writing proficiency than was the multiple-choice test. In the 2012 assessment, students identified errors in two paragraphs adapted from nursing journal articles; the paragraphs contained 60 errors. Mean correct scores were, for master’s students, 22%; for MEPN students, 29%; and for PhD students, 24%.

Conclusion:

In 2010, SON implemented a comprehensive writing program. The program included consultation with an academic coordinator, a 44-hour comprehensive instructional program, peer editing service, and training in stress management. Writing proficiency improved by 30% post-intervention.

Keywords:
Scientific Writing; Nursing Education; Diagnostic
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Scientific Writing from Concept to Implementation in a Graduate Curriculumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEvers-Manly, Shirley D.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Bruceen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsShirley D. Evers-Manly, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, shirleymanlylampkin@cdrewu.edu; Bruce Smith, MA, ELS, Instructor;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304501-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Wednesday, July 24, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b>Historically, nursing school admissions requirements have incorporated an assumption that students arrive on campus proficient in scientific writing. However, once engaged in coursework, many students find that scientific writing is challenging, requiring unaccustomed degrees of accuracy, clarity, and concision and replete with unfamiliar conventions. Meanwhile, professors may feel overwhelmed by excessive time consumed in accommodating to student writing deficiencies. Consequently, nursing educators have two needs: first, the need for a reliable diagnostic instrument that effectively assesses writing proficiency and identifies students who need intervention, and second, interventions that effectively improve students’ writing proficiency. <p><b>Methods: </b>From 2010 through 2012, UCSF School of Nursing (SON) developed a series of scientific writing diagnostic tools that were administered to 559 graduate students. <p><b></b><p><b>Results: </b> <p>In the 2010 assessment, master’s students wrote compositions that were subsequently evaluated for basic writing errors; 87% of compositions were determined to be substandard for successful engagement in graduate study, and composition scores indicated that 49% of student–authors were in need of intervention. In the 2011 assessment, students completed a 40-question (multiple-choice) test on APA Style and edited three paragraphs adapted from nursing journal articles; the paragraphs contained 113 errors. The mean score on the APA Style test was 60% correct; the mean score on the paragraph editing test was only 19% correct. The editing test was a stronger indicator of student writing proficiency than was the multiple-choice test. In the 2012 assessment, students identified errors in two paragraphs adapted from nursing journal articles; the paragraphs contained 60 errors. Mean correct scores were, for master’s students, 22%; for MEPN students, 29%; and for PhD students, 24%. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>In 2010, SON implemented a comprehensive writing program. The program included consultation with an academic coordinator, a 44-hour comprehensive instructional program, peer editing service, and training in stress management. Writing proficiency improved by 30% post-intervention.en_GB
dc.subjectScientific Writingen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Educationen_GB
dc.subjectDiagnosticen_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:37:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:37:22Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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