2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304520
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Care Practices and Nurses' Perceptions of Efficacy
Author(s):
Delgado, Cheryl
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Delta
Author Details:
Cheryl Delgado, PhD, RN, c.delgado@csuohio.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013

Purpose:

This study explores the current spiritual care practices used by nurses and their perceptions of the effectiveness of these practices. Previous research indicates 'nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care and feel ill equipped to do so. There is little information in the literature as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use most frequently and their belief in the effectiveness of the practices they provide.

Methods:

This was an exploratory descriptive design using an online quantitative survey (N=123) and qualitative data from interviews with volunteers (n=5) from the surveyed group. Volunteers were recruited from the nursing alumni of a Midwestern university and the members of the Ohio League for Nurses. Quantitative data analysis was done using the SPSS PASW 18 statistical program. Qualitative content analysis of audio taped interviews was used to support and augment the statistical findings.

Results:

The most frequently used spiritual care interventions were listening to a patient concerns for support/comfort, non-sexual physical contact for support/comfort, and asking about spiritual concerns. Used less often were contacting family or spiritual advisors and communicating patient's spiritual needs with others. Nurse perceived listening to be most effective, followed by assessing spiritual needs, physical contact, and contacting a spiritual advisor.

Conclusion:

Nurses in this study described themselves as spiritual rather than religious and engaged in a number of practices that are supportive rather than overtly religious. The findings different slightly from earlier studies in that prayer was not as frequently used or perceived as effective by the respondents in this study. Nurses were confident in their ability to provide spiritual care and initiated such care. They felt that experience, not formal education, prepared them to do so. They strongly connected caring and holistic practice with providing spiritual care.

Keywords:
holistic care; nursing interventions; spiritual care
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleSpiritual Care Practices and Nurses' Perceptions of Efficacyen
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Cherylen
dc.contributor.departmentNu Deltaen
dc.author.detailsCheryl Delgado, PhD, RN, c.delgado@csuohio.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304520-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>This study explores the current spiritual care practices used by nurses and their perceptions of the effectiveness of these practices. Previous research indicates 'nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care and feel ill equipped to do so. There is little information in the literature as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use most frequently and their belief in the effectiveness of the practices they provide. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>This was an exploratory descriptive design using an online quantitative survey (N=123) and qualitative data from interviews with volunteers (n=5) from the surveyed group. Volunteers were recruited from the nursing alumni of a Midwestern university and the members of the Ohio League for Nurses. Quantitative data analysis was done using the SPSS PASW 18 statistical program. Qualitative content analysis of audio taped interviews was used to support and augment the statistical findings. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>The most frequently used spiritual care interventions were listening to a patient concerns for support/comfort, non-sexual physical contact for support/comfort, and asking about spiritual concerns. Used less often were contacting family or spiritual advisors and communicating patient's spiritual needs with others. Nurse perceived listening to be most effective, followed by assessing spiritual needs, physical contact, and contacting a spiritual advisor. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> <p>Nurses in this study described themselves as spiritual rather than religious and engaged in a number of practices that are supportive rather than overtly religious. The findings different slightly from earlier studies in that prayer was not as frequently used or perceived as effective by the respondents in this study. Nurses were confident in their ability to provide spiritual care and initiated such care. They felt that experience, not formal education, prepared them to do so. They strongly connected caring and holistic practice with providing spiritual care.en
dc.subjectholistic careen
dc.subjectnursing interventionsen
dc.subjectspiritual careen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:37:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:37:54Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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