11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304531
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Noise Reduction in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
Author(s):
Lerma, Dana L.; Thomas, Rene
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Dana L. Lerma, MSN, CPNP-AC, dlerma@luriechildrens.org; Rene Thomas, BSN;
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose: The purpose of this pre and post analysis study is to examine noise levels within a 42 bed PICU at Children’s Memorial Hospital (CMH), and a 40 bed PICU in the new facility at Lurie Children’s (Lurie’s).  The replication of the study at Lurie’s was to ensure that we continue to stay within the OSHA guidelines of recommended noise levels, and determine if structural design and new equipment decreased noise levels while improving patient and family satisfaction scores regarding noise levels.

Methods: Noise levels were recorded at four nursing stations utilizing dosimeters, a recording device, and the Qualitative Noise Contributor Tool.  This tool allows the data collector to document qualitatively what is being heard during the collection period (alarms, talking, etc.). The noise dosimeter read continuously for 23 hours of the day with data being recorded every 15 seconds. Additionally, qualitative noise was recorded and documented over a two minute period, six times daily. Data collection occurred in two phases, one at each facility, over one week.

Results: The study concluded on December 1st; our preliminary results are as follows:

            CMH- average daytime levels: 49-59 dB; average nighttime levels: 40-54 dB

            Our observations show that majority of the noise were a result of talking, overhead announcements and alarms.  Approximately 15% of comments from satisfaction surveys referred to noise issues.     

            Lurie’s- still pending until numeric data has been statistically analyzed.

            Our observations show that the majority of the noise resulted from talking, alarms, and unit phones. There was a decrease in sharp peaks throughout the day and no negative feedback related to noise.

Conclusion:  In designing the Lurie PICU, environmental, structural and new equipment accommodations were made to decrease noise.  Thus, the cumulation of these changes resulted in a decrease in sharp peaks of noise throughout the day and improved patient satisfaction scores.

Keywords:
Patient Satisfaction; Noise; Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNoise Reduction in a Pediatric Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorLerma, Dana L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Reneen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsDana L. Lerma, MSN, CPNP-AC, dlerma@luriechildrens.org; Rene Thomas, BSN;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304531-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, July 22, 2013, Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><strong><b>Purpose: </b></strong>The purpose of this pre and post analysis study is to examine noise levels within a 42 bed PICU at Children’s Memorial Hospital (CMH), and a 40 bed PICU in the new facility at Lurie Children’s (Lurie’s).  The replication of the study at Lurie’s was to ensure that we continue to stay within the OSHA guidelines of recommended noise levels, and determine if structural design and new equipment decreased noise levels while improving patient and family satisfaction scores regarding noise levels. <p><strong><b>Methods: </b></strong>Noise levels were recorded at four nursing stations utilizing dosimeters, a recording device, and the Qualitative Noise Contributor Tool.  This tool allows the data collector to document qualitatively what is being heard during the collection period (alarms, talking, etc.). The noise dosimeter read continuously for 23 hours of the day with data being recorded every 15 seconds. Additionally, qualitative noise was recorded and documented over a two minute period, six times daily. Data collection occurred in two phases, one at each facility, over one week. <p><strong></strong><strong><b>Results: </b></strong><span class="Strong1">The study concluded on December 1st; o</span>ur preliminary results are as follows: <p class="freeformaaa">            CMH- average daytime levels: 49-59 dB; average nighttime levels: 40-54 dB <p class="freeformaaa">            Our observations show that majority of the noise were a result of talking, overhead announcements and alarms.  Approximately 15% of comments from satisfaction surveys referred to noise issues.      <p class="freeformaaa">            Lurie’s- still pending until numeric data has been statistically analyzed. <p class="freeformaaa">            Our observations show that the majority of the noise resulted from talking, alarms, and unit phones. There was a decrease in sharp peaks throughout the day and no negative feedback related to noise. <p class="FreeFormAAA"><strong><b>Conclusion: </b>  </strong>In designing the Lurie PICU, environmental, structural and new equipment accommodations were made to decrease noise.  Thus, the cumulation of these changes resulted in a decrease in sharp peaks of noise throughout the day and improved patient satisfaction scores.en_GB
dc.subjectPatient Satisfactionen_GB
dc.subjectNoiseen_GB
dc.subjectPediatric Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:38:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:38:07Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen_GB
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.