2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304540
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Buddhism and Medical Futility
Author(s):
Hegney, Desley G.; Chan, Tuck Wai
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Desley G. Hegney, PhD, BA (Hons), Dip Nurse Ed, desley.hegney@curtin.edu.au; Tuck Wai Chan, MBA;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Purpose:

'Religious faith and medicine combine harmoniously in Buddhist views, each in its own way helping Buddhists enjoy a more fruitful existence. Health care providers need to understand the spiritual needs of patients in order to provide better care, especially for the terminally ill.

Methods:

'Using a recently reported case to guide the reader, this paper examines the issue of medical futility from a Buddhist perspective.

Results:

Important concepts discussed include compassion, suffering, and the significance of the mind. Compassion from a health professional is essential, and if medical treatment can decrease suffering without altering the clarity of the mind, then a treatment should not be considered futile. Suffering from illness and death, moreover, is considered by Buddhists a normal part of life and is ever-changing. Sickness, old age, birth, and death are integral parts of human life. Suffering is experienced due to the lack of a harmonious state of body, speech, and mind. Buddhists do not believe that the mind is located in the brain, and, for Buddhists, there are ways suffering can be overcome through the control of one's mind.

Conclusion: Health Professionals should be aware of the religion and culture of dying people. They should endeavour to assist the dying to die in a way that honours the person's religious beliefs.

Keywords:
end of life; Buddhism; medical futility
Repository Posting Date:
22-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
22-Oct-2013 ; 22-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
24th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Prague, Czech Republic
Description:
24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBuddhism and Medical Futilityen
dc.contributor.authorHegney, Desley G.en
dc.contributor.authorChan, Tuck Waien
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDesley G. Hegney, PhD, BA (Hons), Dip Nurse Ed, desley.hegney@curtin.edu.au; Tuck Wai Chan, MBA;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304540-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, July 23, 2013</p><b>Purpose: </b> <p>'Religious faith and medicine combine harmoniously in Buddhist views, each in its own way helping Buddhists enjoy a more fruitful existence. Health care providers need to understand the spiritual needs of patients in order to provide better care, especially for the terminally ill. <p><b>Methods: </b> <p>'Using a recently reported case to guide the reader, this paper examines the issue of medical futility from a Buddhist perspective. <p><b>Results: </b> <p>Important concepts discussed include compassion, suffering, and the significance of the mind. Compassion from a health professional is essential, and if medical treatment can decrease suffering without altering the clarity of the mind, then a treatment should not be considered futile. Suffering from illness and death, moreover, is considered by Buddhists a normal part of life and is ever-changing. Sickness, old age, birth, and death are integral parts of human life. Suffering is experienced due to the lack of a harmonious state of body, speech, and mind. Buddhists do not believe that the mind is located in the brain, and, for Buddhists, there are ways suffering can be overcome through the control of one's mind. <p><b>Conclusion: </b> Health Professionals should be aware of the religion and culture of dying people. They should endeavour to assist the dying to die in a way that honours the person's religious beliefs.en
dc.subjectend of lifeen
dc.subjectBuddhismen
dc.subjectmedical futilityen
dc.date.available2013-10-22T20:38:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22-
dc.date.issued2013-10-22en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-22T20:38:20Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.name24th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationPrague, Czech Republicen
dc.description24th International Nursing Research Congress Theme: Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice Through Collaboration. Held at the Hilton Prague Hotel.en
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