Meaningful E-Learning (MEL): A National, Multi-Institution Research Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304809
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Meaningful E-Learning (MEL): A National, Multi-Institution Research Project
Author(s):
Salyers, Vincent; Carter, Lorraine; Myers, Sue; Barrett, Penelope
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Mu-at-Large
Author Details:
Vincent Salyers, EdD,MSN,BA,RN, email: vsalyers@mtroyal.ca, faculty page: http://mtroyal.ca/ProgramsCourses/FacultiesSchoolsCentres/HealthCommunityStudies/ContactUs/vsalyers.htm; Lorraine Carter, PhD, email: lorrainec@nipissingu.ca, faculty page: http://www.nipissingu.ca/about-us/people/Pages/Lorraine-Carter.aspx; Sue Myers, MVTEd,BSW,RPN,email: sue.myers@siast.sk.ca, faculty page: http://gosiast.com/programs-and-courses/programs-by-category/nursing/bio.aspx?e=sue%20myers; Penelope Barrett, PhD
Abstract:

This mixed methods study examined e-learning at three Canadian universities. While e-learning is now characterized by a past and trends within that past, there continues to be uncertainty about how e-learning is defined and conceptualized, whether or not we like e-learning, and whether or not it is as meaningful to us as face to face learning.

Based on a survey of students (n= 1377) and faculty (n=187) as well as student (n=16) and faculty (n=33) focus groups, the following are presented as important findings:  the majority of students studying in e-learning courses appear to be women; reported student experience with e-learning is less than the experience of their faculty; ease of navigation, course design, and previous experience with e-learning consistently demonstrated statistically significant predictive capacity for positive e-learning experiences, and students expressed less preference for e-learning than their instructors.

Study findings hold implications for e-learning faculty, instructional designers, and administrators at post-secondary institutions in Canada and elsewhere where e-learning is part of the institutional mandate.  Additionally, further research into student and faculty perceptions and experiences of e-learning is recommended.

Keywords:
e-learning; mixed-methods
MeSH:
Education, Distance
Repository Posting Date:
30-Oct-2013
Date of Publication:
30-Oct-2013
Conference Date:
2012
Conference Name:
23RD International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Brisbane, Australia
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International; National League for Nursing
Description:
This research abstract was also presented as a research poster at the STTI Research Congress as further detailed in the descriptive fields above. Penelope Barrett presented the poster.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.titleMeaningful E-Learning (MEL): A National, Multi-Institution Research Projecten_US
dc.contributor.authorSalyers, Vincent-
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Lorraine-
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Sue-
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Penelope-
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Mu-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsVincent Salyers, EdD,MSN,BA,RN, email: vsalyers@mtroyal.ca, faculty page: http://mtroyal.ca/ProgramsCourses/FacultiesSchoolsCentres/HealthCommunityStudies/ContactUs/vsalyers.htm; Lorraine Carter, PhD, email: lorrainec@nipissingu.ca, faculty page: http://www.nipissingu.ca/about-us/people/Pages/Lorraine-Carter.aspx; Sue Myers, MVTEd,BSW,RPN,email: sue.myers@siast.sk.ca, faculty page: http://gosiast.com/programs-and-courses/programs-by-category/nursing/bio.aspx?e=sue%20myers; Penelope Barrett, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304809-
dc.description.abstract<p>This mixed methods study examined e-learning at three Canadian universities. While e-learning is now characterized by a past and trends within that past, there continues to be uncertainty about how e-learning is defined and conceptualized, whether or not we like e-learning, and whether or not it is as meaningful to us as face to face learning.</p> <p>Based on a survey of students (n= 1377) and faculty (n=187) as well as student (n=16) and faculty (n=33) focus groups, the following are presented as important findings:  the majority of students studying in e-learning courses appear to be women; reported student experience with e-learning is less than the experience of their faculty; ease of navigation, course design, and previous experience with e-learning consistently demonstrated statistically significant predictive capacity for positive e-learning experiences, and students expressed less preference for e-learning than their instructors.</p> <p>Study findings hold implications for e-learning faculty, instructional designers, and administrators at post-secondary institutions in Canada and elsewhere where e-learning is part of the institutional mandate.  Additionally, further research into student and faculty perceptions and experiences of e-learning is recommended.</p>en_GB
dc.subjecte-learningen_GB
dc.subjectmixed-methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEducation, Distanceen
dc.date.available2013-10-30T20:28:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-30-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-30T20:28:48Z-
dc.conference.date2012en
dc.conference.name23RD International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
dc.conference.locationBrisbane, Australiaen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.sponsorshipNational League for Nursingen
dc.descriptionThis research abstract was also presented as a research poster at the STTI Research Congress as further detailed in the descriptive fields above. Penelope Barrett presented the poster.en_GB
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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