Therapeutic Environmental Effects on Analgesic Requirements in Post Anesthesia Care Unit Phase I

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304855
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Therapeutic Environmental Effects on Analgesic Requirements in Post Anesthesia Care Unit Phase I
Author(s):
Kent, Donna C.; Timmons, Shirley
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Donna Kent MS RN CNOR, email donnie621@bellsouth.net; Shirley Timmons, PhD, MN BSN, email STIMMON@clemson.edu
Abstract:

The noisy and brightly lit environment in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Phase I has the potential to agitate the arousing post anesthesia patient, delay recovering to an awake state, and could increase the need for analgesia medications.  An experimental study was conducted in a community hospital PACU to determine the effects of a therapeutic environment (I.E. low lights and decreased noise) on analgesic requirements and satisfaction of patients recovering from surgery.  Patients who had the quieter and darker environment did require less analgesic medications (reduced lighting p=0005; t= -21.54; mean difference -298.0249; reduced noise exposure p=0.005; t=-3.855; mean difference = -3.72773).  Participants in the control group expressed dissatisfaction with the bright lights while the treatment group had no complaints. Noise levels, which were much more difficult to control, elicited some dissatisfaction from both groups.

Keywords:
Analgesics administration and dosage; Noise; Light; Post anesthesia
MeSH:
Postoperative Care; Anesthesia Recovery Period
Repository Posting Date:
1-Nov-2013
Date of Publication:
1-Nov-2013
Sponsors:
Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleTherapeutic Environmental Effects on Analgesic Requirements in Post Anesthesia Care Unit Phase Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorKent, Donna C.-
dc.contributor.authorTimmons, Shirley-
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDonna Kent MS RN CNOR, email donnie621@bellsouth.net; Shirley Timmons, PhD, MN BSN, email STIMMON@clemson.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304855-
dc.description.abstract<p>The noisy and brightly lit environment in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) Phase I has the potential to agitate the arousing post anesthesia patient, delay recovering to an awake state, and could increase the need for analgesia medications.  An experimental study was conducted in a community hospital PACU to determine the effects of a therapeutic environment (I.E. low lights and decreased noise) on analgesic requirements and satisfaction of patients recovering from surgery.  Patients who had the quieter and darker environment did require less analgesic medications (reduced lighting p=0005; t= -21.54; mean difference -298.0249; reduced noise exposure p=0.005; t=-3.855; mean difference = -3.72773).  Participants in the control group expressed dissatisfaction with the bright lights while the treatment group had no complaints. Noise levels, which were much more difficult to control, elicited some dissatisfaction from both groups.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectAnalgesics administration and dosageen_GB
dc.subjectNoiseen_GB
dc.subjectLighten_GB
dc.subjectPost anesthesiaen_GB
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Careen
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia Recovery Perioden
dc.date.available2013-11-01T20:05:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-01-
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-01T20:05:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipAssociation of Perioperative Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
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