2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/304884
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Quasi-Experimental Study, Other
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Sign Chi Do and Functional Fitness Outcomes
Author(s):
Rogers, Carol E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Delta-at-Large
Author Details:
Carol E. Rogers, PhD, RN, carol-rogers@ouhsc.edu
Abstract:

Summary of Project Aims: Sedentary lifestyle coupled with sarcopenia, a natural aging process, contribute to functional decline among older adults often resulting in premature institutionalization. Balance, endurance, strength, and flexibility training contribute to the ability to perform activities of daily living required to maintain independence and may promote adaptation to healthy aging among sedentary older adults. Meditative Movement (MM) such as Tai Chi, Qigong, and Sign Chi Do (SCD) has been shown to improve many of these physical fitness indicators, with less investigated evidence apparent for the effect on upper body strength and flexibility and sarcopenia. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a 12-week Sign Chi Do (SCD), a low intensity exercise intervention, on functional fitness indicators of balance, endurance, strength, and flexibility and sarcopenia outcomes that affect decreased physical function in sedentary community dwelling adults over the age of 65. Specific Aim 1:Test the effects of SCD among adults over 65 on measures of functional fitness.

Specific Aim 2: Test the effects of SCD among adults over 65 on measures of sarcopenia.   Exploratory Aim 1. Explore the relationship among all variables to determine potential mediation of body composition and inflammatory processes on functional fitness outcomes.

 

Theoretical Framework

The theoretical referent that underpins this research study is the Adaptation-level theory (AL), based on the assumption that increasing stimuli improves the level of adaptation to internal processes.

 

Methods, Procedures and Sampling: 48 sedentary community dwelling adults (mean age 73.96, SD 6.1); mostly female (80 %); white (70 %); and with multiple chronic conditions (75 % reported 3 or more) were enrolled in the study. This was a longitudinal repeated measures design (12 weeks observation followed by 12 weeks SCD intervention), with one within-subjects time factor (T1, pre-intervention; T2, 6 weeks pre-intervention;  T3, 12 weeks pre-intervention; T4, 18 weeks, [6 weeks post-intervention]; and 24 weeks, (12 weeks post-intervention]). Individuals were their own control and attended one-hour weekly SCD sessions over 12 weeks at Urban senior centers. Outcome measures were: balance (Timed Up & Go), endurance (6-minute walk), strength (chair stands and arm curls), flexibility (back scratch and chair sit and reach). Sarcopenia was measured by body composition and proinflammatory cytokines.

 

Summary of Findings: 30 older adults completed the study. Most baseline fitness scores were below the 25th percentile for age and gender. Upper strength and lower flexibility improved from T3 to T5, F(1, 17) = 6.54, p = .02 and 5.67, p = .03 respectively. There was a trend for balance to improve following the 12 week SCD intervention. Balance scores were associated with upper and lower body strength; endurance; and mood (r = .61, .49, .59 and -.48, p < .05 respectively). Body mass index was associated with lower body strength (r = - .44). There were no associations between proinflammatory cytokines and fitness outcomes. Average attendance rates were 9.17 (2.00 SD) classes over 12 weeks. Reasons for missed classes included personal and family illness, family needs, and competing social activities.

 

Recommendations: Results from this study provide evidence that SCD is a low cost, low intensity PA that may promote healthy aging for older adults living in the community. A RCT study testing the effect of SCD on fitness outcomes in all populations is recommended.

Keywords:
exercise; Older adults; physical function
MeSH:
Exercise; Physical Fitness; Aged
Repository Posting Date:
1-Nov-2013
Date of Publication:
1-Nov-2013
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
Grant awarded in 2012; small grant recipient
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelQuasi-Experimental Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleSign Chi Do and Functional Fitness Outcomesen_US
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Carol E.-
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Delta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsCarol E. Rogers, PhD, RN, carol-rogers@ouhsc.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/304884-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Summary of Project Aims:</strong> Sedentary lifestyle coupled with sarcopenia, a natural aging process, contribute to functional decline among older adults often resulting in premature institutionalization. Balance, endurance, strength, and flexibility training contribute to the ability to perform activities of daily living required to maintain independence and may promote adaptation to healthy aging among sedentary older adults. Meditative Movement (MM) such as Tai Chi, Qigong, and Sign Chi Do (SCD) has been shown to improve many of these physical fitness indicators, with less investigated evidence apparent for the effect on upper body strength and flexibility and sarcopenia. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a 12-week Sign Chi Do (SCD), a low intensity exercise intervention, on functional fitness indicators of balance, endurance, strength, and flexibility and sarcopenia outcomes that affect decreased physical function in sedentary community dwelling adults over the age of 65. <strong>Specific Aim 1:</strong>Test the effects of SCD among adults over 65 on measures of functional fitness.</p> <p><strong>Specific Aim 2: </strong>Test the effects of SCD among adults over 65 on measures of sarcopenia.   <strong>Exploratory Aim 1. </strong>Explore the relationship among all variables to determine potential<strong> </strong>mediation of body composition and inflammatory processes on functional fitness outcomes.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Theoretical Framework</strong></p> <p>The theoretical referent that underpins this research study is the Adaptation-level theory (AL), based on the assumption that increasing stimuli improves the level of adaptation to internal processes. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Methods, Procedures and Sampling: </strong>48 sedentary community dwelling adults (mean age 73.96, SD 6.1);<strong> </strong>mostly female (80 %); white (70 %); and with multiple chronic conditions (75 % reported 3 or more) were enrolled in the study. This was a longitudinal repeated measures design (12 weeks observation followed by 12 weeks SCD intervention), with one within-subjects time factor (T1, pre-intervention; T2, 6 weeks pre-intervention;  T3, 12 weeks pre-intervention; T4, 18 weeks, [6 weeks post-intervention]; and 24 weeks, (12 weeks post-intervention]). Individuals were their own control and attended one-hour weekly SCD sessions over 12 weeks at Urban senior centers. Outcome measures were: balance (Timed Up & Go), endurance (6-minute walk), strength (chair stands and arm curls), flexibility (back scratch and chair sit and reach). Sarcopenia was measured by body composition and proinflammatory cytokines.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Summary of Findings: </strong>30 older adults completed the study. Most baseline fitness scores were below the 25<sup>th</sup> percentile for age and gender. Upper strength and lower flexibility improved from T3 to T5, F(1, 17) = 6.54, <em>p </em>= .02 and 5.67, <em>p </em>= .03 respectively. There was a trend for balance to improve following the 12 week SCD intervention. Balance scores were associated with upper and lower body strength; endurance; and mood (<em>r </em>= .61, .49, .59 and -.48, <em>p </em>< .05 respectively). Body mass index was associated with lower body strength (<em>r </em>= - .44). There were no associations between proinflammatory cytokines and fitness outcomes. Average attendance rates were 9.17 (2.00 SD) classes over 12 weeks. Reasons for missed classes included personal and family illness, family needs, and competing social activities.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Recommendations: </strong>Results from this study provide evidence that SCD is a low cost, low intensity PA that may promote healthy aging for older adults living in the community. A RCT study testing the effect of SCD on fitness outcomes in all populations is recommended.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectexerciseen_GB
dc.subjectOlder adultsen_GB
dc.subjectphysical functionen_GB
dc.subject.meshExerciseen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitnessen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.date.available2013-11-01T18:22:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-01-
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-01T18:22:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.descriptionGrant awarded in 2012; small grant recipienten_GB
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item.-
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