Target Zero, Decreasing Narcotic Discrepancies, Increasing Medication Scanning Compliance

3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306546
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Target Zero, Decreasing Narcotic Discrepancies, Increasing Medication Scanning Compliance
Author(s):
Jones, Jerry; Freeman, Kelsie N.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jerry Jones, MBA, BSN, RN, CEN, jerry_jones@hchd.tmc.edu; Kelsie N. Freeman, BSN, RN
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: The emergency center was experiencing a large quantity of narcotic discrepancies. Upon completion of a root cause analysis, medication and patient scanning rates were found to be low; in fact, nurse’s lack of scanning jeopardized patient safety and sustained missed revenue.

Target Zero is the comprehensive program designed and implemented by the leadership team with the goal of improving and sustaining scan rates.

Design: Quality assurance project.

Setting: Urban level 3 Trauma center, teaching facility, 80,000 to 90,000 visits per year.

Participants: All emergency center staff with medication administration privileges.

Privileged staff includes nurses, respiratory therapists, computed tomography and magnetic resonance image technologists.

Methods: Target Zero established a staged progression of implementation. Initially, staff was exposed to campaign advertising and education. After a predetermined start date, March 1st, medication and patient scan rates were electronically monitored and reviewed every two weeks. Managers observe for low performers, less than 85% scan rate in either category. Once identified, managers meet with the individual in order to outline scan expectations. If an avoidable discrepancy was created, progressive counseling was applied.

Results: Target Zero was initiated on March 1st, 2012. Prior to initiation, medication and patient scan rates were 37% and 14% respectively; in addition, 34 discrepancies were associated with these rates. March 31st, 2012 revealed a rise in medication scanning to 68% and patient scan rates improved to 65%. Scanning trends continued to show improvement; specifically, June 2012 rates reached 85% in both categories.

From March 1st to May 30th, the emergency center recorded 7930 narcotic transactions; hence, 16 discrepancies related to documentation were discovered. At this time there is no dollar value associated with the increase in scanning; however, medication is charged to a patient’s account once documented on the medication administration record.

Implications: As the emergency center’s scan trends continue to rise; certainly, the unit’s goal of 90% is within sight. Higher scan rates will improve patient safety and increase chargeable revenue. Benchmark data for emergency center scan rates could not be found; with this in mind, the inpatient benchmark of 95% was used minus 5% due to the volatility of the emergency center. Emergency center leadership must maintain consistent feedback; specifically, high performers are recognized and awarded publicly. Conversely, low performers must be held to unit standards and institutional policy. Managers must empower staff to identify scanning barriers; while at the same time, provide real time resolution for recognized obstacles.

Keywords:
Narcotic Discrepancies
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Shape the Future. Held at the Greater Fort Lauderdale Broward County Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleTarget Zero, Decreasing Narcotic Discrepancies, Increasing Medication Scanning Complianceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Jerryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Kelsie N.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJerry Jones, MBA, BSN, RN, CEN, jerry_jones@hchd.tmc.edu; Kelsie N. Freeman, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306546-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: The emergency center was experiencing a large quantity of narcotic discrepancies. Upon completion of a root cause analysis, medication and patient scanning rates were found to be low; in fact, nurse’s lack of scanning jeopardized patient safety and sustained missed revenue.</p><p>Target Zero is the comprehensive program designed and implemented by the leadership team with the goal of improving and sustaining scan rates.</p><p>Design: Quality assurance project.</p><p>Setting: Urban level 3 Trauma center, teaching facility, 80,000 to 90,000 visits per year.</p><p>Participants: All emergency center staff with medication administration privileges.</p><p>Privileged staff includes nurses, respiratory therapists, computed tomography and magnetic resonance image technologists.</p><p>Methods: Target Zero established a staged progression of implementation. Initially, staff was exposed to campaign advertising and education. After a predetermined start date, March 1st, medication and patient scan rates were electronically monitored and reviewed every two weeks. Managers observe for low performers, less than 85% scan rate in either category. Once identified, managers meet with the individual in order to outline scan expectations. If an avoidable discrepancy was created, progressive counseling was applied.</p><p> Results: Target Zero was initiated on March 1st, 2012. Prior to initiation, medication and patient scan rates were 37% and 14% respectively; in addition, 34 discrepancies were associated with these rates. March 31st, 2012 revealed a rise in medication scanning to 68% and patient scan rates improved to 65%. Scanning trends continued to show improvement; specifically, June 2012 rates reached 85% in both categories.</p><p>From March 1st to May 30th, the emergency center recorded 7930 narcotic transactions; hence, 16 discrepancies related to documentation were discovered. At this time there is no dollar value associated with the increase in scanning; however, medication is charged to a patient’s account once documented on the medication administration record.</p><p>Implications: As the emergency center’s scan trends continue to rise; certainly, the unit’s goal of 90% is within sight. Higher scan rates will improve patient safety and increase chargeable revenue. Benchmark data for emergency center scan rates could not be found; with this in mind, the inpatient benchmark of 95% was used minus 5% due to the volatility of the emergency center. Emergency center leadership must maintain consistent feedback; specifically, high performers are recognized and awarded publicly. Conversely, low performers must be held to unit standards and institutional policy. Managers must empower staff to identify scanning barriers; while at the same time, provide real time resolution for recognized obstacles.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectNarcotic Discrepanciesen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T16:59:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T16:59:33Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationFt. Lauderdale, Florida, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Shape the Future. Held at the Greater Fort Lauderdale Broward County Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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