2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306553
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Over the Rainbow: Decreasing Unnecessary Blood Tube Collection
Author(s):
Phillips, Cherl; Pepito, Bella; Klausing, Barbara; Martin, Becky; Mullen, Mai
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Cherl Phillips, BSN, RN, CEN, cherl.phillips@baylorhealth.edu; Bella Pepito, MHA, RN, CEN; Barbara Klausing, MHA, RN, NE-BC; Becky Martin, MT (ASCP); Mai Mullen, MT (ASCP)
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: To eliminate unnecessary blood tubes collected routinely in the Emergency department

Design: Multidisciplinary team composed of Emergency Department nurses, technicians, laboratory personnel, and LEAN consultant. A proposal was presented to the team to develop specific criteria for blood tube selection based on patient’s chief complaint.

Setting: 37 bed urban Emergency Department with 70,000 patient visits per year and part of an 18 facility health care system.

Participants/Subjects: Emergency Department staff who perform phlebotomy as part of their job responsibilities.

Methods: When Emergency Department nurses and technicians draw blood sample from a patient, a “full rainbow” consisting of seven different color blood tubes were filled majority of the time. The collection of additional blood specimens result in an unnecessary high usage of raw materials, wastage, increase in storage requirements, and increase in Emergency Department and lab personnel workload. A list of common patient chief complaint with corresponding lab work up was placed in a badge buddy and distributed to all Emergency Department nurses and technicians. The badge buddies were also placed in each Emergency Department lab tray and in the treatment rooms for quicker access. The team identified certain laboratory testing that are performed in the same color tube as other tests. Emergency Department staff previously wrote their initials along with the date and time of collection on the tubes. To improve the ease in identifying the Emergency Department staff member who collected the extra tubes, labeling was changed from the staff initials to their employee number. Close monitoring on the number of blood tubes collected was conducted by the lab in a weekly then monthly basis and reported to the members of the team. Emergency Department supervisor reviews the data collected and coaches individual Emergency Department staff member when needed.

Results/Outcomes: The initial goal of the project was a 35% reduction of excess tubes. With ongoing coaching and monitoring from the lab, the new process resulted in 66% reduction in excess tubes after only two months of implementation. The reduction has been maintained. Emergency Department personnel reduced the average number of blood tubes per patient from seven to three. An unexpected result in the reduction of blood tube collection is improved specimen integrity and a decrease in hemolysis rate, thus decreasing the need for recollection. It is predicted that a savings of $20,000.00 would be saved by the end of 2012 with adherence to the new process.

Implications: Partnership between Emergency Departments and laboratories across the health care system are implementing the new process as a LEAN initiative to reduce waste.

Keywords:
Unnecessary Blood Tube Collection
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Shape the Future. Held at the Greater Fort Lauderdale Broward County Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleOver the Rainbow: Decreasing Unnecessary Blood Tube Collectionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Cherlen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPepito, Bellaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKlausing, Barbaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Beckyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Maien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCherl Phillips, BSN, RN, CEN, cherl.phillips@baylorhealth.edu; Bella Pepito, MHA, RN, CEN; Barbara Klausing, MHA, RN, NE-BC; Becky Martin, MT (ASCP); Mai Mullen, MT (ASCP)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306553-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: To eliminate unnecessary blood tubes collected routinely in the Emergency department</p><p>Design: Multidisciplinary team composed of Emergency Department nurses, technicians, laboratory personnel, and LEAN consultant. A proposal was presented to the team to develop specific criteria for blood tube selection based on patient’s chief complaint.</p><p>Setting: 37 bed urban Emergency Department with 70,000 patient visits per year and part of an 18 facility health care system.</p><p>Participants/Subjects: Emergency Department staff who perform phlebotomy as part of their job responsibilities.</p><p>Methods: When Emergency Department nurses and technicians draw blood sample from a patient, a “full rainbow” consisting of seven different color blood tubes were filled majority of the time. The collection of additional blood specimens result in an unnecessary high usage of raw materials, wastage, increase in storage requirements, and increase in Emergency Department and lab personnel workload. A list of common patient chief complaint with corresponding lab work up was placed in a badge buddy and distributed to all Emergency Department nurses and technicians. The badge buddies were also placed in each Emergency Department lab tray and in the treatment rooms for quicker access. The team identified certain laboratory testing that are performed in the same color tube as other tests. Emergency Department staff previously wrote their initials along with the date and time of collection on the tubes. To improve the ease in identifying the Emergency Department staff member who collected the extra tubes, labeling was changed from the staff initials to their employee number. Close monitoring on the number of blood tubes collected was conducted by the lab in a weekly then monthly basis and reported to the members of the team. Emergency Department supervisor reviews the data collected and coaches individual Emergency Department staff member when needed.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: The initial goal of the project was a 35% reduction of excess tubes. With ongoing coaching and monitoring from the lab, the new process resulted in 66% reduction in excess tubes after only two months of implementation. The reduction has been maintained. Emergency Department personnel reduced the average number of blood tubes per patient from seven to three. An unexpected result in the reduction of blood tube collection is improved specimen integrity and a decrease in hemolysis rate, thus decreasing the need for recollection. It is predicted that a savings of $20,000.00 would be saved by the end of 2012 with adherence to the new process.</p><p>Implications: Partnership between Emergency Departments and laboratories across the health care system are implementing the new process as a LEAN initiative to reduce waste.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectUnnecessary Blood Tube Collectionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T16:59:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T16:59:40Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationFt. Lauderdale, Florida, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Shape the Future. Held at the Greater Fort Lauderdale Broward County Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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