Pediatric Emergency Nurses’ Self-Efficacy in Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306562
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Pediatric Emergency Nurses’ Self-Efficacy in Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Screening
Author(s):
Normandin, Patricia A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Patricia A. Normandin, DNP,RN,CEN,CPN,CPEN, pnormandinrn@aol.com
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: Research has shown, for unknown reasons, there is a lack of screening for maternal intimate partner violence in pediatric emergency departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship between pediatric emergency nurses’ self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills in screening for maternal intimate partner violence.

Design: A quantitative descriptive design was used to conduct this study. This study provided information about pediatric emergency nurses’ level of self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills in screening for maternal intimate partner violence.

Setting: Participants setting is where ever they read their email. The setting could be their home, office, or work place.

Participants: Pediatric emergency nurses who met inclusion criteria were those who are NAPNAP (National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners) members, staff nurses, or nurse practitioners who are direct care providers to pediatric emergency patients and currently employed in an emergency department or urgent care setting. The sample is a volunteer, convenience sample taken over a two-week study period. These direct care providers may or may not have advanced degrees or certifications. Exclusion criteria were pediatric nurses who were not NAPNAP members, not direct care providers, those with no internet service, and who do not work in an emergency or urgent care setting.

Methods: The participants were sent an electronic invitation from a secure web site with a request to participate. The secure web site collected the responses anonymously. A 31-item self-efficacy health care provider survey was utilized for data collection. This survey has demonstrated rigor, reliability, and validity. There were three variables;self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills. Self-efficacy is defined as one’s beliefs in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments. Knowledge is defined as the organized, cumulative, and dynamic body of scientific information to help identify, relate, understand, explain, influence, and control nursing phenomena. Skills are defined as deliberate acts or activities in the cognitive and psychomotor domain that operationalize nursing knowledge, skills, values, meaning, and experiences.

Results/Outcomes: Results from this study indicate that nurses who have a high level of self-efficacy, knowledge, and skill will screen for maternal intimate partner r= 0.69 (*p<0.0001). This study found a strong correlation that participants stating a higher overall self-efficacy in assessing and responding to abuse had higher knowledge and skill in screening for maternal intimate partner violence r= 0.69 (*p<0.0001). This supports the research question that the higher the self-efficacy the more likely the screening will be completed.

Implications: Emergency administrators / educators need to increase nursing self-efficacy education and appropriate screening strategies for maternal intimate partner violence. This study provides new information about pediatric emergency nurses’ readiness and ability to conduct intimate partner violence screening. Ultimately, appropriate identification will lead to appropriate referral and decreased emergency services utilization.

Keywords:
Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Screening
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titlePediatric Emergency Nurses’ Self-Efficacy in Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Screeningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNormandin, Patricia A.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsPatricia A. Normandin, DNP,RN,CEN,CPN,CPEN, pnormandinrn@aol.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306562-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Research has shown, for unknown reasons, there is a lack of screening for maternal intimate partner violence in pediatric emergency departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship between pediatric emergency nurses’ self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills in screening for maternal intimate partner violence.</p><p>Design: A quantitative descriptive design was used to conduct this study. This study provided information about pediatric emergency nurses’ level of self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills in screening for maternal intimate partner violence.</p><p>Setting: Participants setting is where ever they read their email. The setting could be their home, office, or work place.</p><p>Participants: Pediatric emergency nurses who met inclusion criteria were those who are NAPNAP (National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners) members, staff nurses, or nurse practitioners who are direct care providers to pediatric emergency patients and currently employed in an emergency department or urgent care setting. The sample is a volunteer, convenience sample taken over a two-week study period. These direct care providers may or may not have advanced degrees or certifications. Exclusion criteria were pediatric nurses who were not NAPNAP members, not direct care providers, those with no internet service, and who do not work in an emergency or urgent care setting.</p><p>Methods: The participants were sent an electronic invitation from a secure web site with a request to participate. The secure web site collected the responses anonymously. A 31-item self-efficacy health care provider survey was utilized for data collection. This survey has demonstrated rigor, reliability, and validity. There were three variables;self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills. Self-efficacy is defined as one’s beliefs in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments. Knowledge is defined as the organized, cumulative, and dynamic body of scientific information to help identify, relate, understand, explain, influence, and control nursing phenomena. Skills are defined as deliberate acts or activities in the cognitive and psychomotor domain that operationalize nursing knowledge, skills, values, meaning, and experiences.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: Results from this study indicate that nurses who have a high level of self-efficacy, knowledge, and skill will screen for maternal intimate partner r= 0.69 (*p<0.0001). This study found a strong correlation that participants stating a higher overall self-efficacy in assessing and responding to abuse had higher knowledge and skill in screening for maternal intimate partner violence r= 0.69 (*p<0.0001). This supports the research question that the higher the self-efficacy the more likely the screening will be completed.</p><p>Implications: Emergency administrators / educators need to increase nursing self-efficacy education and appropriate screening strategies for maternal intimate partner violence. This study provides new information about pediatric emergency nurses’ readiness and ability to conduct intimate partner violence screening. Ultimately, appropriate identification will lead to appropriate referral and decreased emergency services utilization.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectMaternal Intimate Partner Violence Screeningen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T16:59:49Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T16:59:49Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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