2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306565
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Burnout and its Correlates in Emergency Department Nurses
Author(s):
Doede, Megan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Megan Doede, BSN, RN, CEN, mdoede@stagnes.org
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: Nurse burnout and poor nurse work environments have been linked to negative outcomes such as high nurse turnover and vacancy rates and decreased nurse and patient reported quality of care. Because of the high patient volumes and stressful work environments of many emergency departments, emergency nurses may be at increased risk of developing occupational burnout. This study sought to answer the question: Which predictors of occupational burnout are most strongly associated with reported burnout in the emergency nurse?

Design: This was a descriptive study using a non-experimental design.

Setting: This study took place in a 52-bed emergency department in a teaching hospital in an urban setting, which receives approximately 84,000 visits annually.

Participants/Subjects: One-hundred ten emergency nurses were eligible to participate. Fifty-one nurses responded, with ages ranging from 21 to over 50 years, and years of emergency department experience ranging from less than one year to greater than 30 years. Day, evening and night shift were represented, as well as full time, part-time, and weekend-only staff. The clinical nurse manager and nursing director were excluded from the study.

Methods: Nurses were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory—Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Caring Factor Survey- Caring for Self (CFS-CS). The MBI-HSS is a 22-item tool that uses a 6-point Likert scale to quantify the three components of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. The CFS-CS is a 10-item assessment tool that uses a 5-point Likert scale. The MBI-HSS and the CFS-CS have both been tested for validity and reliability. The demographic data sheet included the nurses’ age, length of time spent as an ED nurse, primary shift, and employment status (full or part time) as well as other yes/no questions that address previously identified causes of occupational burnout. Nurses were invited to complete the surveys via an email. To maintain confidentiality, a generic log-on was used.

Results: The three variables that predicted 59.0% of emotional exhaustion included perception of workload in the ED (41.2% of the variance), satisfaction with the nurse-physician relationship (10.9% of the variance), and respondents’ belief that ED nursing suits them as a profession (6.8% of the variance). These findings were statistically significant using an alpha of .05. Caring for self explained 24.7% of the variance of depersonalization (p=.001) and 33.0% of the variance of personal accomplishment. Workload explained 8.0% of the variance for personal accomplishment.

Implications: A review of the existing literature on nurse burnout confirms that it is a commonly occurring phenomenon and predictable based on the presence or absence of certain workplace correlates. However, the potentiating or mediating effects of these correlates is highly variable from one workplace to the next and may extenuate from workplace culture unique to each institution. As nurse burnout remains a contributing factor to attrition from the profession, it may be beneficial for occupational health professionals, nurse managers, and nurse educators to include discussion of nurse burnout as basic competency for staff nurses.

Keywords:
Nurse Burnout
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleBurnout and its Correlates in Emergency Department Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoede, Meganen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsMegan Doede, BSN, RN, CEN, mdoede@stagnes.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306565-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Nurse burnout and poor nurse work environments have been linked to negative outcomes such as high nurse turnover and vacancy rates and decreased nurse and patient reported quality of care. Because of the high patient volumes and stressful work environments of many emergency departments, emergency nurses may be at increased risk of developing occupational burnout. This study sought to answer the question: Which predictors of occupational burnout are most strongly associated with reported burnout in the emergency nurse?</p><p>Design: This was a descriptive study using a non-experimental design.</p><p>Setting: This study took place in a 52-bed emergency department in a teaching hospital in an urban setting, which receives approximately 84,000 visits annually.</p><p>Participants/Subjects: One-hundred ten emergency nurses were eligible to participate. Fifty-one nurses responded, with ages ranging from 21 to over 50 years, and years of emergency department experience ranging from less than one year to greater than 30 years. Day, evening and night shift were represented, as well as full time, part-time, and weekend-only staff. The clinical nurse manager and nursing director were excluded from the study. </p><p>Methods: Nurses were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory—Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Caring Factor Survey- Caring for Self (CFS-CS). The MBI-HSS is a 22-item tool that uses a 6-point Likert scale to quantify the three components of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. The CFS-CS is a 10-item assessment tool that uses a 5-point Likert scale. The MBI-HSS and the CFS-CS have both been tested for validity and reliability. The demographic data sheet included the nurses’ age, length of time spent as an ED nurse, primary shift, and employment status (full or part time) as well as other yes/no questions that address previously identified causes of occupational burnout. Nurses were invited to complete the surveys via an email. To maintain confidentiality, a generic log-on was used.</p><p>Results: The three variables that predicted 59.0% of emotional exhaustion included perception of workload in the ED (41.2% of the variance), satisfaction with the nurse-physician relationship (10.9% of the variance), and respondents’ belief that ED nursing suits them as a profession (6.8% of the variance). These findings were statistically significant using an alpha of .05. Caring for self explained 24.7% of the variance of depersonalization (p=.001) and 33.0% of the variance of personal accomplishment. Workload explained 8.0% of the variance for personal accomplishment.</p><p>Implications: A review of the existing literature on nurse burnout confirms that it is a commonly occurring phenomenon and predictable based on the presence or absence of certain workplace correlates. However, the potentiating or mediating effects of these correlates is highly variable from one workplace to the next and may extenuate from workplace culture unique to each institution. As nurse burnout remains a contributing factor to attrition from the profession, it may be beneficial for occupational health professionals, nurse managers, and nurse educators to include discussion of nurse burnout as basic competency for staff nurses.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectNurse Burnouten_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T16:59:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T16:59:54Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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