No Hablo Ingles: Emergency Department Lived Experiences of Spanish-speaking Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306567
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
No Hablo Ingles: Emergency Department Lived Experiences of Spanish-speaking Patients
Author(s):
Steckel, Arleen; Bellucci, Danielle; Mount, Julie; Hueber, Dawn; Dowdy, Eileen M.; Zazzera, Erin; Feiler, Mary; Masciello, Susan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Arleen Steckel, PhD, RN, CPNP; Danielle Bellucci, BSN, RN, CEN; Julie Mount, MS, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, CPEN, julie.mount@stonybrookmedicine.edu; Dawn Hueber, RN; Eileen M. Dowdy, RN; Erin Zazzera, MPH, RN, CEN; Mary Feiler, BSN, RN, CPEN; Susan Masciello, BSN, RN
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: Few studies have specifically targeted the experience of Spanish-speaking patients in the Emergency Department. Studies have shown that patient populations are growing more diverse. This presents challenges to the Emergency Department staff working in a fast-paced chaotic environment where vital information must be communicated accurately to best assess and treat patients presenting for care. Communicating with a patient who only speaks Spanish creates an obstacle for health care professionals trying to provide appropriate and timely care. The aim of this study was to obtain information to guide change in Emergency Department practice and promote more effective communication and respectful care for Spanish-speaking patients who come to the Emergency Department.

Design: A qualitative design using a phenomenological approach was used to explore the lived experience of Spanish-speaking only adult patients treated in the Emergency Department.

Setting: A 571-bed teaching hospital with a Level One Trauma Center in the northeastern United States.

Participants/Subjects: A purposive sample of 22 patients identified by registration staff was obtained with 13 interviews completed. Spanish-speaking only patients greater or equal to 18 years of age treated in the Emergency Department were consented. The following patients were excluded from this study: those less than 18 years of age, medically unstable, chemically impaired, recent history of domestic/sexual abuse, major psychiatric illness or severely hearing impaired. Approval for the research proposal was obtained from the Institutional Review Board and Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CORIHS).

Method: A demographic form was completed by the patient after consent was obtained. Face-to-face interviews were conducted within 24 hours for patients admitted to the hospital from the Emergency Department. Patients discharged directly from the Emergency Department were interviewed via telephone within 24 hours after discharge. All interviews were conducted by an Emergency Department research nurse who spoke Spanish or used a hospital-approved real-time language-assistance-device. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim by a professional bilingual transcriptionist. Thematic analysis of data to identify common themes was completed using Colaizzi’s phenomenological method.

Results: Three overarching themes emerged during the preliminary thematic analysis: wait times, communication, and patient satisfaction. Patients stated that waiting for an interpreter or assistance-device prolonged their Emergency Department visit. Patients frequently addressed the difficulty communicating with a language discordant staff and language-assistance-devices. They also preferred a Spanish-speaking health care provider during their emergency department visit. Overall, patients stated they were satisfied with the care they received while in the Emergency Department compared to other local hospitals.

Implications: This study generated an emic perspective from Spanish-speaking-only patients regarding their lived experience during their Emergency Department visit. This study identified the need of having Spanish-speaking interpreters readily available 24 hours a day. The information obtained from this study can be useful to guide change in Emergency Department practice to promote effective communication and respectful care for the growing population of Spanish-speaking Emergency Department patients.

Keywords:
Language Barrier
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Shape the Future. Held at the Greater Fort Lauderdale Broward County Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleNo Hablo Ingles: Emergency Department Lived Experiences of Spanish-speaking Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSteckel, Arleenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBellucci, Danielleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMount, Julieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHueber, Dawnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDowdy, Eileen M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZazzera, Erinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeiler, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMasciello, Susanen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsArleen Steckel, PhD, RN, CPNP; Danielle Bellucci, BSN, RN, CEN; Julie Mount, MS, RN, FNP-BC, CEN, CPEN, julie.mount@stonybrookmedicine.edu; Dawn Hueber, RN; Eileen M. Dowdy, RN; Erin Zazzera, MPH, RN, CEN; Mary Feiler, BSN, RN, CPEN; Susan Masciello, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306567-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Few studies have specifically targeted the experience of Spanish-speaking patients in the Emergency Department. Studies have shown that patient populations are growing more diverse. This presents challenges to the Emergency Department staff working in a fast-paced chaotic environment where vital information must be communicated accurately to best assess and treat patients presenting for care. Communicating with a patient who only speaks Spanish creates an obstacle for health care professionals trying to provide appropriate and timely care. The aim of this study was to obtain information to guide change in Emergency Department practice and promote more effective communication and respectful care for Spanish-speaking patients who come to the Emergency Department. </p><p>Design: A qualitative design using a phenomenological approach was used to explore the lived experience of Spanish-speaking only adult patients treated in the Emergency Department.</p><p>Setting: A 571-bed teaching hospital with a Level One Trauma Center in the northeastern United States. </p><p>Participants/Subjects: A purposive sample of 22 patients identified by registration staff was obtained with 13 interviews completed. Spanish-speaking only patients greater or equal to 18 years of age treated in the Emergency Department were consented. The following patients were excluded from this study: those less than 18 years of age, medically unstable, chemically impaired, recent history of domestic/sexual abuse, major psychiatric illness or severely hearing impaired. Approval for the research proposal was obtained from the Institutional Review Board and Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CORIHS).</p><p>Method: A demographic form was completed by the patient after consent was obtained. Face-to-face interviews were conducted within 24 hours for patients admitted to the hospital from the Emergency Department. Patients discharged directly from the Emergency Department were interviewed via telephone within 24 hours after discharge. All interviews were conducted by an Emergency Department research nurse who spoke Spanish or used a hospital-approved real-time language-assistance-device. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim by a professional bilingual transcriptionist. Thematic analysis of data to identify common themes was completed using Colaizzi’s phenomenological method.</p><p>Results: Three overarching themes emerged during the preliminary thematic analysis: wait times, communication, and patient satisfaction. Patients stated that waiting for an interpreter or assistance-device prolonged their Emergency Department visit. Patients frequently addressed the difficulty communicating with a language discordant staff and language-assistance-devices. They also preferred a Spanish-speaking health care provider during their emergency department visit. Overall, patients stated they were satisfied with the care they received while in the Emergency Department compared to other local hospitals.</p><p>Implications: This study generated an emic perspective from Spanish-speaking-only patients regarding their lived experience during their Emergency Department visit. This study identified the need of having Spanish-speaking interpreters readily available 24 hours a day. The information obtained from this study can be useful to guide change in Emergency Department practice to promote effective communication and respectful care for the growing population of Spanish-speaking Emergency Department patients.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectLanguage Barrieren_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T16:59:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T16:59:56Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationFt. Lauderdale, Florida, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Shape the Future. Held at the Greater Fort Lauderdale Broward County Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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