2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306568
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Staff Attitudes of HIV Screening in the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Teel, Alison; Lo, Bruce M.; Gadowski, Laura B.; Knips, Jennifer; Laing, Angie; Martin, Loretta
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Alison Teel, BSN, RN, CEN, teelal@evms.edu; Bruce M. Lo, MD, RDMS; Laura B. Gadowski, MD, MPH; Jennifer Knips, MD; Angie Laing, RN; Loretta Martin, MSN, RN, CEN
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: The CDC issued guidelines in 2006 regarding the opt-out HIV screening strategy as part of routine care in the acute care setting including the Emergency Department (ED). However, many EDs struggle with implementation. The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes of nurses and technicians performing HIV screening in the ED.

Design: A descriptive, cross sectional research study was designed to gather information regarding knowledge and attitudes of performing HIV screening in the ED by nurses and technicians.

Setting: Seven hospital-based EDs and three free-standing EDs were surveyed with an annual volume of 35,000-85,000 patients per year. Only one hospital-based ED had an established HIV screening in place, and was an academic tertiary care, level I trauma center.

Participants: All nurses and technicians who worked in the ED were recruited from seven hospital-based and three free-standing emergency departments. There were no exclusion criteria. All responses were anonymous.

Methods: An anonymous, online survey was created to evaluate attitudes and knowledge regarding HIV screening in the ED. The survey was tested for validity prior to use. Data collection occurred over one month from March 2012 to April 2012. Data was analyzed using chi square analysis.

Results: The survey was distributed to 610 ED nurses and technicians with 170 responses (28%). 53/170 (31%) of the respondents were from the facility that offers HIV screening. 43/170 (25%) respondents were aware of the CDC policy. Respondents who worked where HIV screening is available were more likely than other respondents to know of the CDC policy (19/53 vs. 24/117, OR=2.17 95%CI: 1.06-4.44). 103/170 (60%) were willing to offer HIV screening if available. Those who worked where HIV screening is available were more willing to perform HIV screening than other respondents (39/53 vs. 64/117, OR=2.31 95%CI: 1.13-4.69). Those who worked at the facility that offers HIV testing felt they had enough time to perform the test compared to the other facilities (35/53 vs. 56/117, OR= 2.11 95% 1.08-4.16). The greatest barriers to screening were follow-up concerns (113/170), legal implications (75/170), and inadequate resources (63/170).

Implications: While few were aware of the CDC policy on HIV screening, the majority would offer HIV screening if available. Those who worked at the facility that offer HIV screening were more likely to be aware of the CDC guidelines and feel that they had enough time to perform HIV screening. The greatest barriers to HIV screening identified were follow up concerns, legal implications and inadequate resources. Further efforts should be made to understand and overcome these barriers to HIV screening.

Keywords:
Attitudes in ED re HIV Screening
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleStaff Attitudes of HIV Screening in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorTeel, Alisonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLo, Bruce M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGadowski, Laura B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKnips, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaing, Angieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Lorettaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAlison Teel, BSN, RN, CEN, teelal@evms.edu; Bruce M. Lo, MD, RDMS; Laura B. Gadowski, MD, MPH; Jennifer Knips, MD; Angie Laing, RN; Loretta Martin, MSN, RN, CENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306568-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: The CDC issued guidelines in 2006 regarding the opt-out HIV screening strategy as part of routine care in the acute care setting including the Emergency Department (ED). However, many EDs struggle with implementation. The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes of nurses and technicians performing HIV screening in the ED.</p><p>Design: A descriptive, cross sectional research study was designed to gather information regarding knowledge and attitudes of performing HIV screening in the ED by nurses and technicians.</p><p>Setting: Seven hospital-based EDs and three free-standing EDs were surveyed with an annual volume of 35,000-85,000 patients per year. Only one hospital-based ED had an established HIV screening in place, and was an academic tertiary care, level I trauma center.</p><p>Participants: All nurses and technicians who worked in the ED were recruited from seven hospital-based and three free-standing emergency departments. There were no exclusion criteria. All responses were anonymous.</p><p>Methods: An anonymous, online survey was created to evaluate attitudes and knowledge regarding HIV screening in the ED. The survey was tested for validity prior to use. Data collection occurred over one month from March 2012 to April 2012. Data was analyzed using chi square analysis.</p><p>Results: The survey was distributed to 610 ED nurses and technicians with 170 responses (28%). 53/170 (31%) of the respondents were from the facility that offers HIV screening. 43/170 (25%) respondents were aware of the CDC policy. Respondents who worked where HIV screening is available were more likely than other respondents to know of the CDC policy (19/53 vs. 24/117, OR=2.17 95%CI: 1.06-4.44). 103/170 (60%) were willing to offer HIV screening if available. Those who worked where HIV screening is available were more willing to perform HIV screening than other respondents (39/53 vs. 64/117, OR=2.31 95%CI: 1.13-4.69). Those who worked at the facility that offers HIV testing felt they had enough time to perform the test compared to the other facilities (35/53 vs. 56/117, OR= 2.11 95% 1.08-4.16). The greatest barriers to screening were follow-up concerns (113/170), legal implications (75/170), and inadequate resources (63/170).</p><p>Implications: While few were aware of the CDC policy on HIV screening, the majority would offer HIV screening if available. Those who worked at the facility that offer HIV screening were more likely to be aware of the CDC guidelines and feel that they had enough time to perform HIV screening. The greatest barriers to HIV screening identified were follow up concerns, legal implications and inadequate resources. Further efforts should be made to understand and overcome these barriers to HIV screening.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectAttitudes in ED re HIV Screeningen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T16:59:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T16:59:57Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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