2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306571
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Let Me Help You Wait
Author(s):
Brown, Laura; Rhew, Denise; Berman, Rebecca; Cook, Amanda; Dowd, Patty; Finch, Cynthia; Summerell, Nancy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Laura Brown, BSN, RN, laura.brown@conehealth.com; Denise Rhew, MSN, RN, CEN; Rebecca Berman, ADN, RN; Amanda Cook, BSN, RN, CEN; Patty Dowd, ADN, RN, CEN; Cynthia Finch, ADN, RN, MICN; Nancy Summerell, MSN, RN, CEN
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: In a reimbursement environment that increasingly ties financial remuneration to patient satisfaction, Emergency Departments must prioritize customer satisfaction while continuing to maintain focus on clinical outcomes. There is limited, but promising, data that a lobby assistant in the waiting area of an Emergency Department can have a positive effect on patient satisfaction. As such, the research question was, “What effect will the implementation of a Lobby Assistant have on patient satisfaction scores?”

Design: A literature review using key words such as patient satisfaction, waiting, and triage, yielded few articles regarding the efficacy of a patient advocate in an Emergency Department setting. Several articles reinforced the idea that increased communication between patients and staff resulted in improved patient satisfaction scores. A team of staff and leadership nurses was formed to research the impact of implementing a lobby assistant on patient satisfaction scores.

Setting: A community hospital, which is part of a private, not for profit healthcare system located in the Southeastern United States, was the setting for this study. Specifically, the study was conducted in a 25 bed Emergency Department that sees approximately 62,000 patients a year.

Participants/subjects: Patients and families required to wait in the Emergency Department lobby 30 minutes or more before being escorted into a treatment room. If the patient was a minor, the patient’s family member was asked to complete the survey. Patients who were seeking medical clearance exams or were emergently ill were excluded from the survey.

Methodology: The study was done in two phases. In phase one, patients who had waited 30 minutes or more were asked to complete a six question survey using a 5 point Likert scale when they were called back to a treatment room.

In the second phase, the role of lobby assistant was implemented and staffed by a Nurse Technician (NT) or Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). The survey process used in the first phase was repeated, with three additional questions reflecting the presence of the lobby assistant.

Results: Implementing the lobby assistant role had a positive impact on patient satisfaction scores and improved patients’ perceptions of communication with staff. Part of the lobby assistant implementation included a pamphlet that was designed to explain the Emergency Department process of triage and treatment. This was well received by patients and families. Another positive aspect of the lobby assistant implementation was the reception it received from triage nurses. Triage nurses quickly recognized the benefit of having clinically trained staff in the waiting area to monitor patients and advise them of patients who seemed in need of immediate assistance.

Implications: Due to budgetary constraints in the Emergency Department, a full-time lobby assistant was not implemented. Department leadership chose to implement a part-time non-clinical advocate to round on patients, as well as a “first look nurse,” who checks in all patients as they arrive for treatment. This nurse also rounds in the waiting area to monitor patients and apprises the triage nurse of patients who need immediate care.

Keywords:
Waiting Area Patient Satisfaction
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleLet Me Help You Waiten_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Lauraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRhew, Deniseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Rebeccaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCook, Amandaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDowd, Pattyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFinch, Cynthiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSummerell, Nancyen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsLaura Brown, BSN, RN, laura.brown@conehealth.com; Denise Rhew, MSN, RN, CEN; Rebecca Berman, ADN, RN; Amanda Cook, BSN, RN, CEN; Patty Dowd, ADN, RN, CEN; Cynthia Finch, ADN, RN, MICN; Nancy Summerell, MSN, RN, CENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306571-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: In a reimbursement environment that increasingly ties financial remuneration to patient satisfaction, Emergency Departments must prioritize customer satisfaction while continuing to maintain focus on clinical outcomes. There is limited, but promising, data that a lobby assistant in the waiting area of an Emergency Department can have a positive effect on patient satisfaction. As such, the research question was, “What effect will the implementation of a Lobby Assistant have on patient satisfaction scores?”</p><p>Design: A literature review using key words such as patient satisfaction, waiting, and triage, yielded few articles regarding the efficacy of a patient advocate in an Emergency Department setting. Several articles reinforced the idea that increased communication between patients and staff resulted in improved patient satisfaction scores. A team of staff and leadership nurses was formed to research the impact of implementing a lobby assistant on patient satisfaction scores.</p><p>Setting: A community hospital, which is part of a private, not for profit healthcare system located in the Southeastern United States, was the setting for this study. Specifically, the study was conducted in a 25 bed Emergency Department that sees approximately 62,000 patients a year.</p><p>Participants/subjects: Patients and families required to wait in the Emergency Department lobby 30 minutes or more before being escorted into a treatment room. If the patient was a minor, the patient’s family member was asked to complete the survey. Patients who were seeking medical clearance exams or were emergently ill were excluded from the survey.</p><p>Methodology: The study was done in two phases. In phase one, patients who had waited 30 minutes or more were asked to complete a six question survey using a 5 point Likert scale when they were called back to a treatment room.</p><p>In the second phase, the role of lobby assistant was implemented and staffed by a Nurse Technician (NT) or Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). The survey process used in the first phase was repeated, with three additional questions reflecting the presence of the lobby assistant.</p><p>Results: Implementing the lobby assistant role had a positive impact on patient satisfaction scores and improved patients’ perceptions of communication with staff. Part of the lobby assistant implementation included a pamphlet that was designed to explain the Emergency Department process of triage and treatment. This was well received by patients and families. Another positive aspect of the lobby assistant implementation was the reception it received from triage nurses. Triage nurses quickly recognized the benefit of having clinically trained staff in the waiting area to monitor patients and advise them of patients who seemed in need of immediate assistance.</p><p>Implications: Due to budgetary constraints in the Emergency Department, a full-time lobby assistant was not implemented. Department leadership chose to implement a part-time non-clinical advocate to round on patients, as well as a “first look nurse,” who checks in all patients as they arrive for treatment. This nurse also rounds in the waiting area to monitor patients and apprises the triage nurse of patients who need immediate care.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectWaiting Area Patient Satisfactionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:00Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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