Emergency Department Dispensing Albuterol Inhalers to Reduce Pediatric Asthma Readmissions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306573
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Emergency Department Dispensing Albuterol Inhalers to Reduce Pediatric Asthma Readmissions
Author(s):
Hall, Brad; Novotny, April; Leckie, Maureen; Carter, Pam
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Brad Hall, PharmD, Brad.hall@lrmc.com; April Novotny, MSN, RN, CEN; Maureen Leckie, BSN, RN; Pam Carter, BSN, RN
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: Asthma is a frequent cause of emergency department (ED) visits among children. A number of children discharged with asthma will be readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Compliance with medication regimen is an important factor in decreasing asthma exacerbations. In many cases, affordability of medications may be barrier to compliance. The objective of this study is to determine if dispensing Albuterol inhalers to go home with asthmatic patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department reduced readmission to the emergency department.

Design: This study is a retrospective evaluation of patients treated for asthma in the ED and discharged home. Rates of readmission for patients dispensed albuterol inhalers will be compared to the baseline rate of readmission for patients discharged prior to implementing the program.

Setting: This study was conducted in an urban pediatric 14 bed emergency department with 35,000 annual visits in the southeastern U.S.

Participants: Pediatric Emergency Department patients discharged from the ED to home with asthma related primary diagnosis. The baseline group included all patients from August 1, 2011 through January 31, 2012 discharged home with a prescription for albuterol. The dispensing group additionally included patients that were documented having an albuterol inhaler dispensed home from May 1, 2012 through April 30.2013.

Methods: A retrospective review of patients discharged from the Emergency Department was completed. Readmission rates within 28 days for patients discharged with asthma related primary diagnosis was discerned. Prior to the start of the dispensing program, patients were discharged with a prescription for albuterol. Rates of readmission to the Pediatric Emergency Department prior to the start of the albuterol dispensing program were compared with rates of readmission post implementation to assess the impact of dispensing albuterol inhalers on asthma ED readmissions within a 28 day period. Additionally, rates of readmission will be broken down further into ≤7 days, 8 – 14 days, and 15 – 28 days.

Results: Full results are pending completion of final data collection period. Preliminary data shows a trend toward absolute and relative decrease in readmission rate after program implementation. Projected outcome to show greater than 15% relative reduction in return visits for patients’ dispensed albuterol inhalers compared to those who were discharged with prescriptions for albuterol.

Implications: The current retail price of an albuterol metered dose inhaler is $45.72. Per our hospital policies, partially used albuterol metered dose inhalers may be sent home with patients. These medications must be labeled appropriately with proper dispensing documentation, and must provide drug information material to the patient. To date, there is a paucity of data indicating how ED management of asthma may reduce readmissions. We hypothesize that a possible barrier to compliance with discharge beta – agonist therapy is affordability. By evaluating the impact of our dispensing program on emergency department readmissions, we may contribute to the body of literature surrounding ED pediatric asthma management and provide data for the potential financial benefit of implementing similar programs in emergency department settings.

Keywords:
Dispensing Albuterol Inhalers to Reduce Readmission of Pediatric Asthma Patients
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Dispensing Albuterol Inhalers to Reduce Pediatric Asthma Readmissionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Braden_GB
dc.contributor.authorNovotny, Aprilen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeckie, Maureenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Pamen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsBrad Hall, PharmD, Brad.hall@lrmc.com; April Novotny, MSN, RN, CEN; Maureen Leckie, BSN, RN; Pam Carter, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306573-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Asthma is a frequent cause of emergency department (ED) visits among children. A number of children discharged with asthma will be readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Compliance with medication regimen is an important factor in decreasing asthma exacerbations. In many cases, affordability of medications may be barrier to compliance. The objective of this study is to determine if dispensing Albuterol inhalers to go home with asthmatic patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department reduced readmission to the emergency department.</p><p>Design: This study is a retrospective evaluation of patients treated for asthma in the ED and discharged home. Rates of readmission for patients dispensed albuterol inhalers will be compared to the baseline rate of readmission for patients discharged prior to implementing the program.</p><p>Setting: This study was conducted in an urban pediatric 14 bed emergency department with 35,000 annual visits in the southeastern U.S.</p><p>Participants: Pediatric Emergency Department patients discharged from the ED to home with asthma related primary diagnosis. The baseline group included all patients from August 1, 2011 through January 31, 2012 discharged home with a prescription for albuterol. The dispensing group additionally included patients that were documented having an albuterol inhaler dispensed home from May 1, 2012 through April 30.2013.</p><p>Methods: A retrospective review of patients discharged from the Emergency Department was completed. Readmission rates within 28 days for patients discharged with asthma related primary diagnosis was discerned. Prior to the start of the dispensing program, patients were discharged with a prescription for albuterol. Rates of readmission to the Pediatric Emergency Department prior to the start of the albuterol dispensing program were compared with rates of readmission post implementation to assess the impact of dispensing albuterol inhalers on asthma ED readmissions within a 28 day period. Additionally, rates of readmission will be broken down further into ≤7 days, 8 – 14 days, and 15 – 28 days.</p><p>Results: Full results are pending completion of final data collection period. Preliminary data shows a trend toward absolute and relative decrease in readmission rate after program implementation. Projected outcome to show greater than 15% relative reduction in return visits for patients’ dispensed albuterol inhalers compared to those who were discharged with prescriptions for albuterol.</p><p>Implications: The current retail price of an albuterol metered dose inhaler is $45.72. Per our hospital policies, partially used albuterol metered dose inhalers may be sent home with patients. These medications must be labeled appropriately with proper dispensing documentation, and must provide drug information material to the patient. To date, there is a paucity of data indicating how ED management of asthma may reduce readmissions. We hypothesize that a possible barrier to compliance with discharge beta – agonist therapy is affordability. By evaluating the impact of our dispensing program on emergency department readmissions, we may contribute to the body of literature surrounding ED pediatric asthma management and provide data for the potential financial benefit of implementing similar programs in emergency department settings.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectDispensing Albuterol Inhalers to Reduce Readmission of Pediatric Asthma Patientsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:02Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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