2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306574
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Social Behavioral Needs of Patients with Sickle Cell Disease
Author(s):
Tanabe, Paula; Rutherford, Carlton D. M.; Cline, David M.; De Castro, Laura M.; Silva, Susan G.; Sullivan, Dori Taylor; Thornton, Victoria L.; Freiermuth, Caroline; Hinnant, Jontue’
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Paula Tanabe, PhD, MSN, RN, MPH, Paula.tanabe@duke.edu; Carlton D. M. Rutherford, M.Div., MSW, LCSW; David M. Cline, MD; Laura M. De Castro, MD; Susan G. Silva, PhD; Dori Taylor Sullivan, PhD, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, FAAN; Victoria L. Thornton, MD, MBA, FACEP; Caroline Freiermuth, MD; Jontue’ Hinnant, BSN, BA, RN
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) frequently experience either complex social situations or behavioral health co-morbidities such as anxiety and depression. The objective of this study is to report the number of patients who expressed a desire to have a social or behavioral health referral made during an Emergency Department (ED) visit and the response to these requests, including the number of referrals actually made, and number of patients who self-reported anxiety or depression during the same visit.

Design: An observational, multi-site study.

Setting: Two teaching EDs in North Carolina.

Subjects: Adult SCD patients with an ED visit for an acute vaso-occlusive crisis were eligible for inclusion. Thirty five adults (mean age 32, 51% male) completed a total of 40 different interviews, five patients completed more than one interview. Informed consent was obtained prior to conducting patient interviews or medical record reviews.

Methods: Forty interviews were conducted within two weeks of an ED visit, over a period of six months. All attempts were made to select patients for interview using stratification based on admission or discharge ED status (50% each), and the number of ED visits (<2, 3-4, >5) in the three months prior to the ED visits. Patients were asked “Do you feel it would have been helpful to receive a social work referral at your last ED visit?”, and “Do you feel it would have been helpful to receive a psychiatrist or behavioral health specialist referral at your last ED visit?” Patients were also asked if they generally felt depressed or anxious. The medical record was reviewed for evidence of a referral made during that visit. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the self-reported desire for a referral and evidence of a referral made.

Results: Patients reported the need for a social service referral during 15 visits (37%, 3 additional patients reported already receiving services and 2 were unsure), and behavioral health referral during 9 visits (23%, 3 additional patients were already receiving services and 3 were unsure). No social service referrals were made, and one psych-behavioral health referral was made. During 30% of the visits patients reported feeling depressed and 25% reported feeling anxious.

Implications: The perceived need for either a social or behavioral health referral was common among adults with SCD, yet referrals were rarely made. Interventions to address social and behavioral health needs are an important component of the comprehensive care of chronically ill patients. The SCD research and quality improvement teams are currently developing a strategy to partner with ED social workers to perform a basic social-behavioral health screen for all SCD patients seen in the ED. Any patient who screens positive will be referred to the out-patient or in-patient social worker for further interventions focused on the patients’ social behavioral health needs.

Keywords:
Social Behavioral Needs of Patients with Sickle Cell Disease
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleSocial Behavioral Needs of Patients with Sickle Cell Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTanabe, Paulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Carlton D. M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCline, David M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDe Castro, Laura M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSilva, Susan G.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Dori Tayloren_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Victoria L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFreiermuth, Carolineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHinnant, Jontue’en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsPaula Tanabe, PhD, MSN, RN, MPH, Paula.tanabe@duke.edu; Carlton D. M. Rutherford, M.Div., MSW, LCSW; David M. Cline, MD; Laura M. De Castro, MD; Susan G. Silva, PhD; Dori Taylor Sullivan, PhD, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, FAAN; Victoria L. Thornton, MD, MBA, FACEP; Caroline Freiermuth, MD; Jontue’ Hinnant, BSN, BA, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306574-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) frequently experience either complex social situations or behavioral health co-morbidities such as anxiety and depression. The objective of this study is to report the number of patients who expressed a desire to have a social or behavioral health referral made during an Emergency Department (ED) visit and the response to these requests, including the number of referrals actually made, and number of patients who self-reported anxiety or depression during the same visit.</p><p>Design: An observational, multi-site study.</p><p>Setting: Two teaching EDs in North Carolina.</p><p>Subjects: Adult SCD patients with an ED visit for an acute vaso-occlusive crisis were eligible for inclusion. Thirty five adults (mean age 32, 51% male) completed a total of 40 different interviews, five patients completed more than one interview. Informed consent was obtained prior to conducting patient interviews or medical record reviews.</p><p>Methods: Forty interviews were conducted within two weeks of an ED visit, over a period of six months. All attempts were made to select patients for interview using stratification based on admission or discharge ED status (50% each), and the number of ED visits (<2, 3-4, >5) in the three months prior to the ED visits. Patients were asked “Do you feel it would have been helpful to receive a social work referral at your last ED visit?”, and “Do you feel it would have been helpful to receive a psychiatrist or behavioral health specialist referral at your last ED visit?” Patients were also asked if they generally felt depressed or anxious. The medical record was reviewed for evidence of a referral made during that visit. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the self-reported desire for a referral and evidence of a referral made.</p><p>Results: Patients reported the need for a social service referral during 15 visits (37%, 3 additional patients reported already receiving services and 2 were unsure), and behavioral health referral during 9 visits (23%, 3 additional patients were already receiving services and 3 were unsure). No social service referrals were made, and one psych-behavioral health referral was made. During 30% of the visits patients reported feeling depressed and 25% reported feeling anxious.</p><p>Implications: The perceived need for either a social or behavioral health referral was common among adults with SCD, yet referrals were rarely made. Interventions to address social and behavioral health needs are an important component of the comprehensive care of chronically ill patients. The SCD research and quality improvement teams are currently developing a strategy to partner with ED social workers to perform a basic social-behavioral health screen for all SCD patients seen in the ED. Any patient who screens positive will be referred to the out-patient or in-patient social worker for further interventions focused on the patients’ social behavioral health needs.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectSocial Behavioral Needs of Patients with Sickle Cell Diseaseen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:03Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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