2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306575
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Emergency Provider Attitudes Towards Sickle Cell Patients
Author(s):
Tanabe, Paula; Cline, David M.; Hinnant, Jontue’; Randolph, Susan; Silva, Susan G.; Sullivan, Dori Taylor; Thornton, Victoria L.; White, Ann; Freiermuth, Caroline
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Paula Tanabe, PhD, MSN, RN, MPH, Paula.tanabe@duke.edu; David M. Cline, MD; Jontue’ Hinnant, BSN, BA, RN; Susan Randolph, RN, CEN; Susan G. Silva, PhD; Dori Taylor Sullivan, PhD, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, FAAN; Victoria L. Thornton, MD, MBA, FACEP; Ann White, MSN, RN, CEN, CCNS, CPEN; Caroline Freiermuth, MD
Abstract:

Research Abstract

Purpose: Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) often present to the Emergency Department (ED) for treatment during a vaso-occlusive crisis and have reported experiencing negative attitudes from providers. We sought to validate a survey that measures attitudes towards SCD patients in a sample of ED providers, and compare differences in attitude scores between provider types.

Design: A descriptive study was conducted.

Setting: Two North Carolina Emergency Departments.

Subjects: Two hundred ED providers including residents, nurses, attending physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants participated in the study.

Methods: An attitudes survey, previously validated in a sample of medical providers, was administered to a convenience sample of ED providers. The survey assessed provider perception of and satisfaction in caring for SCD patients and also gathered responses to the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS), which was administered to establish construct validity. Principal factor analysis was performed to identify underlying subscales of the survey. Subscales, constructed by summing items with factor loadings of +0.40 or greater, were linear transformed onto a 0-100 scale. Provider types were compared using analysis of covariance, adjusting for years of practice. To assess construct validity of the subscales in the ED setting, Partial Spearman correlations were conducted to examine the relation between the subscales and MCRS total scores.

Results: The factor structure, based on 200 surveys, identified 3 subscales: Negative attitudes, Uneasiness with care, and Positive attitudes. Cronbach’s alphas for the subscales and MCRS were 0.93, 0.83, 0.82, and 0.86, respectively. Means (SD) for the Negative, Uneasiness, and Positive subscales and MCRS were 61.5 (20.3), 66.1 (17.1), 41.2 (17.8), and 42.2 (SD=8.9). Compared to physicians (n=88), nurses (n=111) reported significantly higher Negative scores (nurses M=65.8, SD=22.4; physicians M=56.0, SD=15.8, p=.0003) and lower Uneasiness scores (nurses M=62.0, SD=17.0; physicians M=71.5, SD=15.9, p<.0001). Scores did not differ on the Positive scale. Nurses had significantly lower MCRS scores (M=41.2, SD=9.2) than physicians (M=43.6, SD=8.2, p=.0108). MCRS scores were significantly correlated with the subscale scores (Negative rs -0.64; Uneasiness rs 0.23; Positive rs .61, p <.002).

Implications: The attitudes survey tool provides a valid measure of ED provider attitudes towards SCD patients. Nurses have higher negative attitudes scores, lower uneasiness with care scores, and lower medical condition regard scores than physicians.

Keywords:
Attitudes toward Sickle Cell Patients in ED
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleEmergency Provider Attitudes Towards Sickle Cell Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTanabe, Paulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCline, David M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHinnant, Jontue’en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRandolph, Susanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSilva, Susan G.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Dori Tayloren_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Victoria L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFreiermuth, Carolineen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsPaula Tanabe, PhD, MSN, RN, MPH, Paula.tanabe@duke.edu; David M. Cline, MD; Jontue’ Hinnant, BSN, BA, RN; Susan Randolph, RN, CEN; Susan G. Silva, PhD; Dori Taylor Sullivan, PhD, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, FAAN; Victoria L. Thornton, MD, MBA, FACEP; Ann White, MSN, RN, CEN, CCNS, CPEN; Caroline Freiermuth, MDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306575-
dc.description.abstract<p>Research Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) often present to the Emergency Department (ED) for treatment during a vaso-occlusive crisis and have reported experiencing negative attitudes from providers. We sought to validate a survey that measures attitudes towards SCD patients in a sample of ED providers, and compare differences in attitude scores between provider types.</p><p>Design: A descriptive study was conducted.</p><p>Setting: Two North Carolina Emergency Departments.</p><p>Subjects: Two hundred ED providers including residents, nurses, attending physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants participated in the study.</p><p>Methods: An attitudes survey, previously validated in a sample of medical providers, was administered to a convenience sample of ED providers. The survey assessed provider perception of and satisfaction in caring for SCD patients and also gathered responses to the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS), which was administered to establish construct validity. Principal factor analysis was performed to identify underlying subscales of the survey. Subscales, constructed by summing items with factor loadings of +0.40 or greater, were linear transformed onto a 0-100 scale. Provider types were compared using analysis of covariance, adjusting for years of practice. To assess construct validity of the subscales in the ED setting, Partial Spearman correlations were conducted to examine the relation between the subscales and MCRS total scores.</p><p>Results: The factor structure, based on 200 surveys, identified 3 subscales: Negative attitudes, Uneasiness with care, and Positive attitudes. Cronbach’s alphas for the subscales and MCRS were 0.93, 0.83, 0.82, and 0.86, respectively. Means (SD) for the Negative, Uneasiness, and Positive subscales and MCRS were 61.5 (20.3), 66.1 (17.1), 41.2 (17.8), and 42.2 (SD=8.9). Compared to physicians (n=88), nurses (n=111) reported significantly higher Negative scores (nurses M=65.8, SD=22.4; physicians M=56.0, SD=15.8, p=.0003) and lower Uneasiness scores (nurses M=62.0, SD=17.0; physicians M=71.5, SD=15.9, p<.0001). Scores did not differ on the Positive scale. Nurses had significantly lower MCRS scores (M=41.2, SD=9.2) than physicians (M=43.6, SD=8.2, p=.0108). MCRS scores were significantly correlated with the subscale scores (Negative rs -0.64; Uneasiness rs 0.23; Positive rs .61, p <.002).</p><p>Implications: The attitudes survey tool provides a valid measure of ED provider attitudes towards SCD patients. Nurses have higher negative attitudes scores, lower uneasiness with care scores, and lower medical condition regard scores than physicians.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectAttitudes toward Sickle Cell Patients in EDen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:04Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:04Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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