Emergency Department Team Training: Using Simulation to Improve Nurse Confidence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306585
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Emergency Department Team Training: Using Simulation to Improve Nurse Confidence
Author(s):
Frey, Mary; Shaw, Julie; Mittiga, Matthew R.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Mary Frey, BSN, RN, CPN, CPEN, mary.frey@cchmc.org; Julie Shaw, MSN, MBA, RN, CEN; Matthew R. Mittiga, MD
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: High fidelity simulation team training is a valuable tool that can improve interdisciplinary communication and enhance collaboration when addressing clinical problems. The objective of this project was to utilize high fidelity simulation with immediate debriefing to provide pediatric ED care teams with an opportunity to manage simulated critically ill patients and to assess the effect of this learning method on clinician confidence levels in communication effectiveness and clinical management.

esign: ED team simulation training is used as a learning tool for our large multidisciplinary team. This is a descriptive study examining pre- and post-simulation nurse confidence levels regarding communication effectiveness and clinical management in the team environment.

Setting: Simulation center at a large, Midwestern, urban, tertiary care children’s hospital with Level I trauma status.

Participants/Subjects: Participation was voluntary. The multidisciplinary team included registered nurses (RN), physicians, respiratory therapists, patient-care assistants (PCA) and paramedics. Participant experience in the ED setting varied from 6 months to 20 years. Sixty eight staff participated (38 RN’s, 16 physicians, 7 PCA’s, 6 paramedics and 1 respiratory therapist) in 8 simulation sessions. Each session included on average 2 Emergency Medicine Fellows, 5 RN’s, 1 PCA and 1 paramedic.

Methods: Eight simulation team training sessions were scheduled from February 2010-May 2012. An experienced ED physician/nurse team co-facilitated each session. In each 1.5 hour training sessions, one medical and one trauma resuscitation scenario were simulated. Scenarios were chosen to give team members the opportunity to practice high-risk, low-frequency events and focus on team communication and clinical management. Following each simulation a 20 minute debriefing session occurred. Pre- and post-simulation questionnaires were completed by participants to assess confidence levels in teamwork/communication and management of the medical or trauma diagnosis in the latter 5 sessions. Twenty three RN’s completed questionnaires.

Results/Outcomes: The average length of ED nursing experience for the RN’s surveyed was 3.9 years (range 5 months-14 years). Eleven RN’s (48%) had ≤ 2 years of ED nursing experience. 8 RN’s (34.7%) rated their confidence with communication effectiveness as improved after the medical scenario simulation and 7 RN’s (30.4%) rated similar improvement after the trauma scenario. 2 RN’s (8.6%) rated their confidence with effective clinical management as improved after the medical scenario simulation and 5 (21.7%) rated improved confidence with clinical management after the trauma scenario. Nurses with ≤ 2 years of ED experience demonstrated no change in confidence of clinical management during either medical or trauma resuscitation scenarios. For this same group of new ED nurses communication effectiveness improved for 5 RN’s (45.4%) after the medical simulation and for 4 RN’s (36.3%) after the trauma simulation.

Implications: High fidelity simulation training is a valuable tool that can improve team communication and clinical management in the ED. Confidence with effective communication improved more than confidence with clinical management of critically ill patients in our study. Nurse participation in resuscitation simulation training with a multidisciplinary ED team contributes to improved confidence in communication during resuscitative care particularly for nurses with less than 2 years of ED experience.

Keywords:
Simulation to Improve Nurse Confidence
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Team Training: Using Simulation to Improve Nurse Confidenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrey, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Julieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMittiga, Matthew R.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsMary Frey, BSN, RN, CPN, CPEN, mary.frey@cchmc.org; Julie Shaw, MSN, MBA, RN, CEN; Matthew R. Mittiga, MDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306585-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: High fidelity simulation team training is a valuable tool that can improve interdisciplinary communication and enhance collaboration when addressing clinical problems. The objective of this project was to utilize high fidelity simulation with immediate debriefing to provide pediatric ED care teams with an opportunity to manage simulated critically ill patients and to assess the effect of this learning method on clinician confidence levels in communication effectiveness and clinical management. </p><p>esign: ED team simulation training is used as a learning tool for our large multidisciplinary team. This is a descriptive study examining pre- and post-simulation nurse confidence levels regarding communication effectiveness and clinical management in the team environment. </p><p>Setting: Simulation center at a large, Midwestern, urban, tertiary care children’s hospital with Level I trauma status.</p><p>Participants/Subjects: Participation was voluntary. The multidisciplinary team included registered nurses (RN), physicians, respiratory therapists, patient-care assistants (PCA) and paramedics. Participant experience in the ED setting varied from 6 months to 20 years. Sixty eight staff participated (38 RN’s, 16 physicians, 7 PCA’s, 6 paramedics and 1 respiratory therapist) in 8 simulation sessions. Each session included on average 2 Emergency Medicine Fellows, 5 RN’s, 1 PCA and 1 paramedic.</p><p>Methods: Eight simulation team training sessions were scheduled from February 2010-May 2012. An experienced ED physician/nurse team co-facilitated each session. In each 1.5 hour training sessions, one medical and one trauma resuscitation scenario were simulated. Scenarios were chosen to give team members the opportunity to practice high-risk, low-frequency events and focus on team communication and clinical management. Following each simulation a 20 minute debriefing session occurred. Pre- and post-simulation questionnaires were completed by participants to assess confidence levels in teamwork/communication and management of the medical or trauma diagnosis in the latter 5 sessions. Twenty three RN’s completed questionnaires.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: The average length of ED nursing experience for the RN’s surveyed was 3.9 years (range 5 months-14 years). Eleven RN’s (48%) had ≤ 2 years of ED nursing experience. 8 RN’s (34.7%) rated their confidence with communication effectiveness as improved after the medical scenario simulation and 7 RN’s (30.4%) rated similar improvement after the trauma scenario. 2 RN’s (8.6%) rated their confidence with effective clinical management as improved after the medical scenario simulation and 5 (21.7%) rated improved confidence with clinical management after the trauma scenario. Nurses with ≤ 2 years of ED experience demonstrated no change in confidence of clinical management during either medical or trauma resuscitation scenarios. For this same group of new ED nurses communication effectiveness improved for 5 RN’s (45.4%) after the medical simulation and for 4 RN’s (36.3%) after the trauma simulation.</p><p>Implications: High fidelity simulation training is a valuable tool that can improve team communication and clinical management in the ED. Confidence with effective communication improved more than confidence with clinical management of critically ill patients in our study. Nurse participation in resuscitation simulation training with a multidisciplinary ED team contributes to improved confidence in communication during resuscitative care particularly for nurses with less than 2 years of ED experience.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectSimulation to Improve Nurse Confidenceen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:14Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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