2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306607
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
No Patients, No Preceptors, No Problems; Innovative Staff Development
Author(s):
Kessel, Jami
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jami Kessel, BSN, RN, CPEN, jkessel@nemours.org
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: In a new hospital that is not seeing patients and that does not have preceptors, how are competencies and critical thinking validated? The purpose of this evidenced based study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a non traditional staff orientation program.

Design: Staff development project, education.

Setting: This study took place in a brand new pediatric hospital licensed for 95 beds with an 18 bed emergency department in a southern state. The hospital was preparing to open and not yet caring for patients at the time of the study.

Participants/Subjects: The participants were the emergency department nurses and paramedics hired at the start of orientation. All subjects were required to have 2 years emergency department or paramedic experience. There were 33 participants total. Registered nurses had an average of 11.7 years experience with the paramedics averaging 8.5 years experience. All registered nurses had emergency department experience varying from mixed pediatric and adult patients to only pediatric patients.

Methods: On the first day of department orientation, the staff was given a knowledge assessment exam. This exam was modeled after the Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse exam. The content of the exam was structured similar to that of the CPEN with the appropriate weight given to sections. The exam pulled sample questions from well known CPEN review books, and the staff was given the exam in a proctored setting. After testing, the staff was not given a copy of the exam, the answers, nor were they told their results. The staff proceeded to go through a non traditional department orientation. This consisted of three months of didactic, skills, and simulations sessions. At the conclusion of department orientation the staff was given the same exam in a proctored setting. The pre- and post exams were scored and the results compared.

Results/Outcomes: The average pre-orientation exam score was 71.5% (questions missed = 34). Registered nurses averaged 71.9% (questions missed = 34), and paramedics averaged 70.6% (questions missed = 35). The average post-orientation exam score was 79.8% (questions missed = 24). Registered nurses averaged 80.7% (questions missed = 23), and paramedics averaged 77.9 (average questions missed = 27).

Implications: A non traditional orientation program that is rich in didactic, skills and simulation but that does not utilize preceptors or involve direct care of patients can be an effective method of orientation. This staff development project challenges the traditional practice of orientation and can lead to innovative approaches to preparing staff to be competent in the clinical setting. Recommendations should be made to leaders in the emergency department to be creative in developing orientation programs with special consideration to resource management (limiting costs in relation to traditional orientation processes) and risk reduction (new associates are not learning on patients).

Keywords:
Innovative Staff Development
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleNo Patients, No Preceptors, No Problems; Innovative Staff Developmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorKessel, Jamien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJami Kessel, BSN, RN, CPEN, jkessel@nemours.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306607-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: In a new hospital that is not seeing patients and that does not have preceptors, how are competencies and critical thinking validated? The purpose of this evidenced based study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a non traditional staff orientation program.</p><p>Design: Staff development project, education.</p><p> Setting: This study took place in a brand new pediatric hospital licensed for 95 beds with an 18 bed emergency department in a southern state. The hospital was preparing to open and not yet caring for patients at the time of the study.</p><p> Participants/Subjects: The participants were the emergency department nurses and paramedics hired at the start of orientation. All subjects were required to have 2 years emergency department or paramedic experience. There were 33 participants total. Registered nurses had an average of 11.7 years experience with the paramedics averaging 8.5 years experience. All registered nurses had emergency department experience varying from mixed pediatric and adult patients to only pediatric patients.</p><p>Methods: On the first day of department orientation, the staff was given a knowledge assessment exam. This exam was modeled after the Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse exam. The content of the exam was structured similar to that of the CPEN with the appropriate weight given to sections. The exam pulled sample questions from well known CPEN review books, and the staff was given the exam in a proctored setting. After testing, the staff was not given a copy of the exam, the answers, nor were they told their results. The staff proceeded to go through a non traditional department orientation. This consisted of three months of didactic, skills, and simulations sessions. At the conclusion of department orientation the staff was given the same exam in a proctored setting. The pre- and post exams were scored and the results compared.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: The average pre-orientation exam score was 71.5% (questions missed = 34). Registered nurses averaged 71.9% (questions missed = 34), and paramedics averaged 70.6% (questions missed = 35). The average post-orientation exam score was 79.8% (questions missed = 24). Registered nurses averaged 80.7% (questions missed = 23), and paramedics averaged 77.9 (average questions missed = 27). </p><p>Implications: A non traditional orientation program that is rich in didactic, skills and simulation but that does not utilize preceptors or involve direct care of patients can be an effective method of orientation. This staff development project challenges the traditional practice of orientation and can lead to innovative approaches to preparing staff to be competent in the clinical setting. Recommendations should be made to leaders in the emergency department to be creative in developing orientation programs with special consideration to resource management (limiting costs in relation to traditional orientation processes) and risk reduction (new associates are not learning on patients).</p>en_GB
dc.subjectInnovative Staff Developmenten_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:40Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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