2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306610
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Another Set of Hands-Exploring Nurse On-Call Coverage in Emergency Departments
Author(s):
Brennan, Denise; Robin, Nancy M.; Pappas, Cheryl; Amore, Christopher; Corbett, James
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Denise Brennan, MSN, RN, CNL, dbrennan@lifespan.org; Nancy M.Robin, MEd, RN, CEN, Cheryl Pappas, BSN, RN, CEN; Christopher Amore, BA, RN; James Corbett, BS, RN
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: Emergency Departments are challenged to provide timely care for patients without advanced knowledge of surges in acuity or volume. This emergency department wanted to explore opportunities to enhance our ability to improve patient access as well as safely serve patients presenting during surges. Planning is a key step. Could an on-call nurse program be the answer?

Design: Patient Safety Initiative.

Setting: Teaching, urban emergency department with 60,000 visits.

Participants: Staff RN’s, Nurse Educator, Director of Emergency Services, Assistant Clinical Managers.

Method: Staff identified that at times of high acuity or surge, “another set of hands” that could be depended on, would be helpful to ensure safe patient care. Often this nurse would be needed for a short time. It was difficult to know which nurse would be available on short notice. A shared governance model was necessary for program success. Focus groups were used to brainstorm ideas. Nurses could utilize an on-call availability list but this would only solve part of the problem. On short notice, much time was spent attempting to secure resources, but existing strategies were not always successful. An on-call program in the ED is progressive. Traditionally, such programs are designed for areas that do not have 24 hour coverage. It was important to maintain work-life balance. Nurses selected the length of the on-call shifts and hours to be covered based on identified trends and are compensated for being on-call. The existing self scheduling model was utilized to sign up for a call shift in advance. A procedure was developed to guide decisions on activation and guidelines are in place to ensure that this is an emergency on-call plan that would not replace standard staffing procedures for routine staffing coverage.

Results/Outcomes: The emergency on-call program was launched June 2012. The focus group structure has been maintained to work through any issues. Through evaluation, dialog and action, the program guidelines have been revised and refined since the launch. The on-call system is activated an average of 17 hours per month. Although being available for call has its’ challenges, the staff nurses and leadership’s ultimate goal to provide timely emergency care during times of increased patient demand has been met.

Implications: Engaging leadership and staff to seek solutions to maintain a safe patient care environment may include the development of an on-call process. Developing an on-call process for nurses should never replace standard staffing practices.

Keywords:
Nurse On-call Coverage in ED
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleAnother Set of Hands-Exploring Nurse On-Call Coverage in Emergency Departmentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Deniseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobin, Nancy M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPappas, Cherylen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAmore, Christopheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorbett, Jamesen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsDenise Brennan, MSN, RN, CNL, dbrennan@lifespan.org; Nancy M.Robin, MEd, RN, CEN, Cheryl Pappas, BSN, RN, CEN; Christopher Amore, BA, RN; James Corbett, BS, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306610-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Emergency Departments are challenged to provide timely care for patients without advanced knowledge of surges in acuity or volume. This emergency department wanted to explore opportunities to enhance our ability to improve patient access as well as safely serve patients presenting during surges. Planning is a key step. Could an on-call nurse program be the answer? </p><p>Design: Patient Safety Initiative.</p><p>Setting: Teaching, urban emergency department with 60,000 visits.</p><p>Participants: Staff RN’s, Nurse Educator, Director of Emergency Services, Assistant Clinical Managers.</p><p>Method: Staff identified that at times of high acuity or surge, “another set of hands” that could be depended on, would be helpful to ensure safe patient care. Often this nurse would be needed for a short time. It was difficult to know which nurse would be available on short notice. A shared governance model was necessary for program success. Focus groups were used to brainstorm ideas. Nurses could utilize an on-call availability list but this would only solve part of the problem. On short notice, much time was spent attempting to secure resources, but existing strategies were not always successful. An on-call program in the ED is progressive. Traditionally, such programs are designed for areas that do not have 24 hour coverage. It was important to maintain work-life balance. Nurses selected the length of the on-call shifts and hours to be covered based on identified trends and are compensated for being on-call. The existing self scheduling model was utilized to sign up for a call shift in advance. A procedure was developed to guide decisions on activation and guidelines are in place to ensure that this is an emergency on-call plan that would not replace standard staffing procedures for routine staffing coverage.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: The emergency on-call program was launched June 2012. The focus group structure has been maintained to work through any issues. Through evaluation, dialog and action, the program guidelines have been revised and refined since the launch. The on-call system is activated an average of 17 hours per month. Although being available for call has its’ challenges, the staff nurses and leadership’s ultimate goal to provide timely emergency care during times of increased patient demand has been met.</p><p>Implications: Engaging leadership and staff to seek solutions to maintain a safe patient care environment may include the development of an on-call process. Developing an on-call process for nurses should never replace standard staffing practices.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectNurse On-call Coverage in EDen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:42Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:42Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.