9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306616
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Emergency Department Nurses Reporting at the Bedside to Intensive Care Nurses
Author(s):
Schmit, Catie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Catie Schmit, BSN, RN, CEN, cschmit@centegra.com
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: Bedside Reporting encourages patients and families to feel empowered, involved, and safe. It supports early problem recognition, promotion of the nurse-patient relationship, and a collaborative transition of care. Communication issues, cited as a root cause in more than 80% of reported sentinel events, led the Joint Commission (2009) to recommend that organizations implement standardized interactive hand-off reporting system that allow asking and responding to questions between health care providers. Although there is significant literature addressing bedside reporting on inpatient units, little is found on Emergency Department (ED) bedside report. The purpose of this initiative was to develop and implement a standardized face to face hand-off report from the ED to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

Design: Nursing Teams from the ED and the ICU identified an opportunity to improve the handoff transition from the ED to the ICU. With the support of leadership, current literature was reviewed to develop an evidenced-based tool and process for implementation.

Setting: 188 Bed Community Hospital. 18 Bed ICU. 22 Bed ED. Level 2 Trauma Center.

Participants/Subjects: Participants included 48 ED Nurses, 17 ED Nurse Technicians, 52 ICU Nurses, patients (Annual Census 35,425 with 20% Admitted), and their families.

Methods: Involved staff was educated on this process change at departmental meetings via presentations and hand outs. A protocol was developed that required the ICU RN to come to the ED for hand off report once the ICU bed was assigned. ICU and ED utilized customized Bedside Report Tools (in SBAR format) to facilitate an organized verbal report at the bedside and to verify IV drip medications prior to the transition of care. After 6 weeks, qualitative data was collected via patient and staff comments, leader rounding, meetings, and Press Ganey Surveys. Occurrence Reports (MIDAS) related to a change in patient condition after arrival to the inpatient unit were reviewed. Synthesis of this data demonstrated the impact of this process change on both the patient and Nursing Team.

Results/Outcomes: Qualitative data revealed an increased level of accountability and trust between the ED and ICU nurses, along with opportunities for combined patient assessment, review of orders and IV infusions, and an opportunity for ICU to ask questions with real time feedback. Patients and families had an increase in understanding and comfort with the patient’s current illness and care plan. After implementation of the process in ICU and Telemetry, there was a 75% decrease in occurrence reports submitted due to change in patient condition.

Implications: The results of implementing a standard of bedside reporting on any unit, can increase RN and patient satisfaction, as well as decrease the likelihood of medical errors or patient deterioration. Future research on this process should include validation that this style of reporting improves the quality of report, reduces the chance of patient deterioration, and supports positive patient satisfaction. Additional research that may be of benefit is the impact of this process on ED Throughput.

Keywords:
Bedside Reporting
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Nurses Reporting at the Bedside to Intensive Care Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchmit, Catieen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCatie Schmit, BSN, RN, CEN, cschmit@centegra.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306616-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Bedside Reporting encourages patients and families to feel empowered, involved, and safe. It supports early problem recognition, promotion of the nurse-patient relationship, and a collaborative transition of care. Communication issues, cited as a root cause in more than 80% of reported sentinel events, led the Joint Commission (2009) to recommend that organizations implement standardized interactive hand-off reporting system that allow asking and responding to questions between health care providers. Although there is significant literature addressing bedside reporting on inpatient units, little is found on Emergency Department (ED) bedside report. The purpose of this initiative was to develop and implement a standardized face to face hand-off report from the ED to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).</p><p>Design: Nursing Teams from the ED and the ICU identified an opportunity to improve the handoff transition from the ED to the ICU. With the support of leadership, current literature was reviewed to develop an evidenced-based tool and process for implementation.</p><p>Setting: 188 Bed Community Hospital. 18 Bed ICU. 22 Bed ED. Level 2 Trauma Center.</p><p>Participants/Subjects: Participants included 48 ED Nurses, 17 ED Nurse Technicians, 52 ICU Nurses, patients (Annual Census 35,425 with 20% Admitted), and their families.</p><p>Methods: Involved staff was educated on this process change at departmental meetings via presentations and hand outs. A protocol was developed that required the ICU RN to come to the ED for hand off report once the ICU bed was assigned. ICU and ED utilized customized Bedside Report Tools (in SBAR format) to facilitate an organized verbal report at the bedside and to verify IV drip medications prior to the transition of care. After 6 weeks, qualitative data was collected via patient and staff comments, leader rounding, meetings, and Press Ganey Surveys. Occurrence Reports (MIDAS) related to a change in patient condition after arrival to the inpatient unit were reviewed. Synthesis of this data demonstrated the impact of this process change on both the patient and Nursing Team.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: Qualitative data revealed an increased level of accountability and trust between the ED and ICU nurses, along with opportunities for combined patient assessment, review of orders and IV infusions, and an opportunity for ICU to ask questions with real time feedback. Patients and families had an increase in understanding and comfort with the patient’s current illness and care plan. After implementation of the process in ICU and Telemetry, there was a 75% decrease in occurrence reports submitted due to change in patient condition.</p><p>Implications: The results of implementing a standard of bedside reporting on any unit, can increase RN and patient satisfaction, as well as decrease the likelihood of medical errors or patient deterioration. Future research on this process should include validation that this style of reporting improves the quality of report, reduces the chance of patient deterioration, and supports positive patient satisfaction. Additional research that may be of benefit is the impact of this process on ED Throughput.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectBedside Reportingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:47Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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