“Were You Drinking Tonight” – A Model for Emergency Department Registered Nurses to Address Patient Substance Use

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306621
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
“Were You Drinking Tonight” – A Model for Emergency Department Registered Nurses to Address Patient Substance Use
Author(s):
Mitchell, Ann M.; Fioravanti, Marie A.; Kane,Irene; Hagle, Holly; Owens, Kimberly; Lindsay, Dawn; Puskar, Kathryn; Boucek, Lynn; Talcott, Kimberly
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Ann M. Mitchell, PhD, RN, FAAN, ammi@pitt.edu; Marie A. Fioravanti, DNP, RN; Irene Kane, PhD, RN, CNAA, HFS; Holly Hagle, PhD; Kimberly Owens, DrPH, MSN; Dawn Lindsay, PhD; Kathryn Puskar, DrPH, RN, FAAN; Lynn Boucek, RN; Kimberly Talcott, MPA
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: This project delivers an educational and skill-building curriculum to Emergency Department Registered Nurses (EDRNs) to teach them to identify and address patient alcohol and drug use as it contributes to a patient’s emergency room visit. By identifying and addressing patient alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, EDRNs can reduce the immediate and long-term health risks associated with high risk substance use among emergency department patients.

Design: Project design includes a qualitative and quantitative evaluation component of an evidence-based practice training and implementation program within the emergency department. Trainers utilize a specific evidence-based practice: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), to provide EDRNs a public health model for universal AOD screening.

Setting: One urban and one rural hospital emergency department have participated in the project to date. The urban hospital is an acute care community hospital treating a largely underserved population. The rural hospital is a sole community provider where the emergency room often serves as a basic primary care site for community residents with no established healthcare provider. The project training and competency review sessions are conducted onsite within the emergency departments.

Participants/Subjects: The total participants include 40 EDRNs, 20 other emergency department staff, and 7 mental health and/or behavioral health professionals. The total sample across sites was 70% female, predominantly white, and with the majority holding Bachelor’s or Associate’s degrees. Non-identifying participant IDs were used to collect qualitative and quantitative data.

Methods: Participants attended a 1.5 hour face-to-face training session on SBIRT, took a 1.5 hour online course as a review session, and received one-on-one guidance (booster sessions) to learn how to use SBIRT as part of their comprehensive diagnostic assessment in the emergency department. Participants completed the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (AAPPQ), the Drug and Drug Problems Questionnaire (DDPPQ), and a measure of SBIRT knowledge, before and after the training sessions.

Results/Outcomes: Preliminary outcome data indicate that EDRNs and other staff in the emergency department responded well to the training. The qualitative data showed that EDRNs found the training to be beneficial. Participants indicated some uncertainty with respect to documentation and billing, common implementation-related issues. The quantitative data (from the questionnaires) show that both perceptions and attitudes toward patients with AOD problems and knowledge of SBIRT significantly increased from pre- to post-training. Further, the motivation subscale on the AAPPQ was significantly correlated with the knowledge score, indicating a possible relationship.

Implications: Outcomes indicated that the training was associated with positive changes in SBIRT knowledge and perceptions of competence and confidence to intervene with patients using alcohol and other drugs among staff in two different emergency department settings. SBIRT is a useful tool to help staff detect problematic alcohol and drug use before specialty care is required, improving the quality of services in the emergency department.

Keywords:
Model to address patient substance use
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.title“Were You Drinking Tonight” – A Model for Emergency Department Registered Nurses to Address Patient Substance Useen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Ann M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFioravanti, Marie A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKane,Ireneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHagle, Hollyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, Dawnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPuskar, Kathrynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoucek, Lynnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTalcott, Kimberlyen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnn M. Mitchell, PhD, RN, FAAN, ammi@pitt.edu; Marie A. Fioravanti, DNP, RN; Irene Kane, PhD, RN, CNAA, HFS; Holly Hagle, PhD; Kimberly Owens, DrPH, MSN; Dawn Lindsay, PhD; Kathryn Puskar, DrPH, RN, FAAN; Lynn Boucek, RN; Kimberly Talcott, MPAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306621-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: This project delivers an educational and skill-building curriculum to Emergency Department Registered Nurses (EDRNs) to teach them to identify and address patient alcohol and drug use as it contributes to a patient’s emergency room visit. By identifying and addressing patient alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, EDRNs can reduce the immediate and long-term health risks associated with high risk substance use among emergency department patients.</p><p>Design: Project design includes a qualitative and quantitative evaluation component of an evidence-based practice training and implementation program within the emergency department. Trainers utilize a specific evidence-based practice: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), to provide EDRNs a public health model for universal AOD screening.</p><p>Setting: One urban and one rural hospital emergency department have participated in the project to date. The urban hospital is an acute care community hospital treating a largely underserved population. The rural hospital is a sole community provider where the emergency room often serves as a basic primary care site for community residents with no established healthcare provider. The project training and competency review sessions are conducted onsite within the emergency departments.</p><p>Participants/Subjects: The total participants include 40 EDRNs, 20 other emergency department staff, and 7 mental health and/or behavioral health professionals. The total sample across sites was 70% female, predominantly white, and with the majority holding Bachelor’s or Associate’s degrees. Non-identifying participant IDs were used to collect qualitative and quantitative data.</p><p>Methods: Participants attended a 1.5 hour face-to-face training session on SBIRT, took a 1.5 hour online course as a review session, and received one-on-one guidance (booster sessions) to learn how to use SBIRT as part of their comprehensive diagnostic assessment in the emergency department. Participants completed the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (AAPPQ), the Drug and Drug Problems Questionnaire (DDPPQ), and a measure of SBIRT knowledge, before and after the training sessions.</p><p>Results/Outcomes: Preliminary outcome data indicate that EDRNs and other staff in the emergency department responded well to the training. The qualitative data showed that EDRNs found the training to be beneficial. Participants indicated some uncertainty with respect to documentation and billing, common implementation-related issues. The quantitative data (from the questionnaires) show that both perceptions and attitudes toward patients with AOD problems and knowledge of SBIRT significantly increased from pre- to post-training. Further, the motivation subscale on the AAPPQ was significantly correlated with the knowledge score, indicating a possible relationship.</p><p>Implications: Outcomes indicated that the training was associated with positive changes in SBIRT knowledge and perceptions of competence and confidence to intervene with patients using alcohol and other drugs among staff in two different emergency department settings. SBIRT is a useful tool to help staff detect problematic alcohol and drug use before specialty care is required, improving the quality of services in the emergency department.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectModel to address patient substance useen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:51Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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