2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/306624
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Poster
Title:
Family Support Committee Positively Impacts Care in the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Swigart, Carol; Black, Erin; Creech, Stacey; Lantis, Daniel; Mosel/Thompson, Sasha
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Carol Swigart,, BSN, RN, CPEN, swigartc@childrensdayton.org; Erin Black, BSN, RN, CPEN; Stacey Creech; Daniel Lantis, RN; Sasha Mosel/Thompson, MS, RN, CPNP
Abstract:

Evidence-based Practice Abstract

Purpose: Family presence during resuscitation in the emergency department has been a position statement of the Emergency Nurses Association since 1995. The formation of an Emergency Department (ED) Family Support Committee in the ED has facilitated the development of a skilled group of caregivers which has improved the quality of care for patients and families experiencing crisis situations. This team of caregivers has provided a dedicated ED staff member 24/7 to help family members cope when faced with a critical illness/injury. In addition, the presence of a family support person has allowed those staff members providing clinical care for the patient to stay focused on their job.

Design: This is a quality assurance project that promotes consistent, skilled support to patients and families in times of crisis.

Setting: Pediatric Emergency Department, level 2 trauma center which treats approximately 72, 000 patients per year. In this past year, the ED Support team assisted 24 families whose children expired as well as many others in crisis.

Participants: Patients and their family members in crisis including those with new oncology diagnoses. Staff involved with patient and family care during the ED visit.

Methods: Since 2007, several changes have been made to the Family Support Committee. One of the committee leaders obtained a certification in Death and Grief Studies which has provided tools to companion families who are experiencing critical medical incidents. Additionally, the ED benchmarked with another children’s hospital in designing a room devoted to supporting families in crisis. An ED specific department policy on bereavement was developed to provide guidelines in caring for deceased patients and to promote a safe environment through the bereavement process. The committee members also routinely educate staff through presentations and hands-on training. A survey of ED staff members, including providers, was conducted to determine the perceived benefit of a dedicated family support person. In addition, surveys are routinely sent to bereaved families approximately one year after death to assess the family’s opinion about our services.

Results: Of 76 staff members who responded to a survey, 97% felt having family support in the ED is very important. When asked how often the family support person is appreciated by the family, 63% of staff surveyed stated ‘always’ and 37% stated ‘very often’. All families whose child expired in the ED are sent a letter and survey about one year after the death. Of these families, ten of them returned their surveys and 90% felt that the support information provided was beneficial. 80 % of these families stated that the family support team member during the ED visit was excellent.

Implications: Having a trained, dedicated family support staff member assigned to families provides emotional care, support and direction. These caregivers also offer families of critically ill or injured patients resources as appropriate. In addition, the family support person collaborates and gives guidance to all members of the care team.

Keywords:
Family Support Committee in the ED
Repository Posting Date:
9-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
9-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
2013 ENA Annual Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Description:
2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.titleFamily Support Committee Positively Impacts Care in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwigart, Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Erinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCreech, Staceyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLantis, Danielen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMosel/Thompson, Sashaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCarol Swigart,, BSN, RN, CPEN, swigartc@childrensdayton.org; Erin Black, BSN, RN, CPEN; Stacey Creech; Daniel Lantis, RN; Sasha Mosel/Thompson, MS, RN, CPNPen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/306624-
dc.description.abstract<p>Evidence-based Practice Abstract</p><p>Purpose: Family presence during resuscitation in the emergency department has been a position statement of the Emergency Nurses Association since 1995. The formation of an Emergency Department (ED) Family Support Committee in the ED has facilitated the development of a skilled group of caregivers which has improved the quality of care for patients and families experiencing crisis situations. This team of caregivers has provided a dedicated ED staff member 24/7 to help family members cope when faced with a critical illness/injury. In addition, the presence of a family support person has allowed those staff members providing clinical care for the patient to stay focused on their job.</p><p>Design: This is a quality assurance project that promotes consistent, skilled support to patients and families in times of crisis.</p><p>Setting: Pediatric Emergency Department, level 2 trauma center which treats approximately 72, 000 patients per year. In this past year, the ED Support team assisted 24 families whose children expired as well as many others in crisis.</p><p>Participants: Patients and their family members in crisis including those with new oncology diagnoses. Staff involved with patient and family care during the ED visit.</p><p>Methods: Since 2007, several changes have been made to the Family Support Committee. One of the committee leaders obtained a certification in Death and Grief Studies which has provided tools to companion families who are experiencing critical medical incidents. Additionally, the ED benchmarked with another children’s hospital in designing a room devoted to supporting families in crisis. An ED specific department policy on bereavement was developed to provide guidelines in caring for deceased patients and to promote a safe environment through the bereavement process. The committee members also routinely educate staff through presentations and hands-on training. A survey of ED staff members, including providers, was conducted to determine the perceived benefit of a dedicated family support person. In addition, surveys are routinely sent to bereaved families approximately one year after death to assess the family’s opinion about our services.</p><p>Results: Of 76 staff members who responded to a survey, 97% felt having family support in the ED is very important. When asked how often the family support person is appreciated by the family, 63% of staff surveyed stated ‘always’ and 37% stated ‘very often’. All families whose child expired in the ED are sent a letter and survey about one year after the death. Of these families, ten of them returned their surveys and 90% felt that the support information provided was beneficial. 80 % of these families stated that the family support team member during the ED visit was excellent.</p><p>Implications: Having a trained, dedicated family support staff member assigned to families provides emotional care, support and direction. These caregivers also offer families of critically ill or injured patients resources as appropriate. In addition, the family support person collaborates and gives guidance to all members of the care team.en_GB
dc.subjectFamily Support Committee in the EDen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-09T17:00:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-09-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T17:00:54Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name2013 ENA Annual Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationNashville, Tennessee, USAen_GB
dc.description2013 ENA Annual Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at Gaylord Resort and Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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