Exploring New Ways to Improve Work Environments--Hospitals and Colleges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/307836
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring New Ways to Improve Work Environments--Hospitals and Colleges
Author(s):
Mintz-Binder, Ronda D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Theta
Author Details:
Ronda D. Mintz-Binder, DNP, RN, CNE, rondamb@uta.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

High turnover of key leadership positions and extended, unfilled vacancies are two concerning trends reflective of both hospitals and institutes of higher learning.  Middle managers (nursing managers; academic program directors) set the ambiance for their employees, and if overworked, do negatively alter the work climate.  A stressed environment adds to a decreased staff morale which can lead to resignations, ultimately affecting the consumer. Understanding the dynamics of emotional demands within this key role is critical and yet has been minimally addressed in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore the overall psychosocial work environment of nursing academic administrators in the United States to gain understanding of what may be the contributing factors to the increasing turnover rate noted and to suggest significant intervention strategies. An exploratory, correlational design was used with 242 associate degree nursing (A.D.N.) program directors in the US using a convenience sample. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II with 28 subscales of work environment variables, along with demographic questions were sent via email. The Work Demand Scale was highest with 63.5 median and Health/Well-being Scale was second highest with 47.9 median. These scales positively correlated with a Spearman Rho=.52(p<.01). Stress and burnout subscales correlated high with a Spearman Rho=.83 (p<.01) and sleep related concerns correlated with stress and burnout with a Spearman Rho=.67 (p<.01).Intervention is warranted to offset the stress and workload demand that directors are currently facing. However, to truly create meaningful change, evidence suggests that the hierarchical leadership structure of educational institutions and hospitals will need to be significantly altered. A new wave of democratic leadership principles has been implemented in businesses with profound results. These same principles need to be implemented from the top administrative tier downward for any significant and long lasting results to occur.

Keywords:
burnout; leadership; nurse managers
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring New Ways to Improve Work Environments--Hospitals and Collegesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMintz-Binder, Ronda D.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsRonda D. Mintz-Binder, DNP, RN, CNE, rondamb@uta.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/307836-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"><p>High turnover of key leadership positions and extended, unfilled vacancies are two concerning trends reflective of both hospitals and institutes of higher learning.  Middle managers (nursing managers; academic program directors) set the ambiance for their employees, and if overworked, do negatively alter the work climate.  A stressed environment adds to a decreased staff morale which can lead to resignations, ultimately affecting the consumer. Understanding the dynamics of emotional demands within this key role is critical and yet has been minimally addressed in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore the overall psychosocial work environment of nursing academic administrators in the United States to gain understanding of what may be the contributing factors to the increasing turnover rate noted and to suggest significant intervention strategies. An exploratory, correlational design was used with 242 associate degree nursing (A.D.N.) program directors in the US using a convenience sample. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire II with 28 subscales of work environment variables, along with demographic questions were sent via email. The Work Demand Scale was highest with 63.5 median and Health/Well-being Scale was second highest with 47.9 median. These scales positively correlated with a Spearman Rho=.52(<i>p</i><.01). Stress and burnout subscales correlated high with a Spearman Rho=.83 (<i>p</i><.01) and sleep related concerns correlated with stress and burnout with a Spearman Rho=.67 (<i>p</i><.01).Intervention is warranted to offset the stress and workload demand that directors are currently facing. However, to truly create meaningful change, evidence suggests that the hierarchical leadership structure of educational institutions and hospitals will need to be significantly altered. A new wave of democratic leadership principles has been implemented in businesses with profound results. These same principles need to be implemented from the top administrative tier downward for any significant and long lasting results to occur. </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>en_GB
dc.subjectburnouten_GB
dc.subjectleadershipen_GB
dc.subjectnurse managersen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:23:04Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:23:04Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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