An Investigation of a Theoretical Model of Health-Related Outcomes of Resilience in Middle Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/307839
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Investigation of a Theoretical Model of Health-Related Outcomes of Resilience in Middle Adolescents
Author(s):
Scoloveno, Robert L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Tau
Author Details:
Robert L. Scoloveno, RN, MS, PhD(c), rscolove@rutgers.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013

The purpose of this study was to develop and test a theory-based structural equation model to better understand resilience and its direct and indirect effects on theorized health outcomes in middle adolescents.  The study empirically tested the direct effects of resilience on a) hope, b) well-being, and c) health-promoting lifestyles, and the direct effects of hope on (a) well-being and (b) health promoting lifestyles.  The indirect effects of resilience on (a) well-being, and (b) health-promoting lifestyle through hope were also tested.

The final sample of 311 of middle-adolescents, aged 15 to 17, was obtained by recruiting students at a northern New Jersey public high school.  Participants completed the demographic data sheet and four instruments measuring the study variables during their regularly scheduled health classes.

The just-identified theoretical model was tested with the LISREL 8.80 software program.    Results indicated that resilience had a direct effect on hope (γ = .66, p < .001), well-being (γ = .44,  p < .001), and health-promoting lifestyles (γ = .56,  p < .001).  Hope also had a direct effect on well-being (β = .42,  p < .001), and health-promoting lifestyle (β =.26, p < .001). Finally, resilience had an indirect effect on both well-being and health-promoting lifestyle through hope.  The unhypothesized correlated error term between well-being and health promoting lifestyle, the two dependent variables, was statistically significant (Ψ = 0.13, p < .001).  

The study findings contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge base regarding health-outcomes of resilience in middle adolescents. Nursing implications focus on the strongest relationships found in the model, which were between resilience and hope and resilience and health promoting lifestyles.  Future research needs to test the theoretical model in early and late adolescents.

Keywords:
Resilience; Health; Adolescent
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Investigation of a Theoretical Model of Health-Related Outcomes of Resilience in Middle Adolescentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScoloveno, Robert L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Tauen_GB
dc.author.detailsRobert L. Scoloveno, RN, MS, PhD(c), rscolove@rutgers.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/307839-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013</p>The purpose of this study was to develop and test a theory-based structural equation model to better understand resilience and its direct and indirect effects on theorized health outcomes in middle adolescents.  The study empirically tested the direct effects of resilience on a) hope, b) well-being, and c) health-promoting lifestyles, and the direct effects of hope on (a) well-being and (b) health promoting lifestyles.  The indirect effects of resilience on (a) well-being, and (b) health-promoting lifestyle through hope were also tested. <p>The final sample of 311 of middle-adolescents, aged 15 to 17, was obtained by recruiting students at a northern New Jersey public high school.  Participants completed the demographic data sheet and four instruments measuring the study variables during their regularly scheduled health classes. <p>The just-identified theoretical model was tested with the LISREL 8.80 software program.    Results indicated that resilience had a direct effect on hope (γ = .66, <i>p</i><i> </i>< .001), well-being (γ = .44,  <i>p </i>< .001), and health-promoting lifestyles (γ = .56,  <i>p </i>< .001).  Hope also had a direct effect on well-being (β = .42, <i> p </i>< .001), and health-promoting lifestyle (β<i> =.</i>26, <i>p </i>< .001). Finally, resilience had an indirect effect on both well-being and health-promoting lifestyle through hope.  The unhypothesized correlated error term between well-being and health promoting lifestyle, the two dependent variables, was statistically significant (Ψ = 0.13, <i>p </i>< .001).   <p>The study findings contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge base regarding health-outcomes of resilience in middle adolescents. Nursing implications focus on the strongest relationships found in the model, which were between resilience and hope and resilience and health promoting lifestyles.  Future research needs to test the theoretical model in early and late adolescents.en_GB
dc.subjectResilienceen_GB
dc.subjectHealthen_GB
dc.subjectAdolescenten_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:23:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:23:10Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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