A Comparison of Two Perinatal Mood Disorder Assessment Instruments Used in the Hospital Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/307888
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Two Perinatal Mood Disorder Assessment Instruments Used in the Hospital Setting
Author(s):
Vander Laan, Karen J.; Roberts, Nancy Jo
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Karen J. Vander Laan, PhD, MSN, RN, karen.vanderlaan2@spectrumhealth.org; Nancy Jo Roberts, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

The global prevalence of Perinatal Mood Disorders (PMD) after giving birth has been reported as 13% in high-income countries and around 20% in low- and lower-middle-income countries.  PMD are serious mental health problems that can lead to complications for mothers, newborns, and families.  The 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), a PMD assessment instrument commonly used worldwide, asks questions regarding the mother’s symptoms and feelings over the past seven days.  As a symptom-based instrument, it can be helpful for ongoing clinical monitoring of a mother at risk for PMD but may not always accurately detect depression risk.  An 11-item Postpartum Depression Risk Assessment (PDRA) was collaboratively developed in 2006 by an interprofessional hospital-based team and is currently used in many maternal-infant units.  The PDRA screens the mother’s risks for developing PMD based on past and current medical, emotional, and social history.  Our nursing staff wondered if it was important to use both instruments so that no high-risk mother would be overlooked.  We conducted a descriptive, comparative, IRB-exempt study of de-identified EPDS and PDRA data collected from a convenience sample of 585 mothers within 24 hours of delivery.  We examined the prevalence of PMD risk and risk profiles for mothers reporting a difficult pregnancy or birth, a multiple birth, or a baby receiving neonatal services.  Comparing the two assessments, we calculated the level of agreement of predicted PMD risk and identified items that clustered together through principal components analysis with oblique rotation.  Four factors were detected:  stress, emotional response, history, and self-harm.  We concluded that the EPDS and PDRA are assessing different risk factors for PMD.  We recommend that both assessments be used in the hospital setting to assure detection of mothers at high-risk for PMD so they can be connected with PMD resources beyond discharge.
Keywords:
Factor Analysis; Women's Services; Patient Safety
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Two Perinatal Mood Disorder Assessment Instruments Used in the Hospital Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVander Laan, Karen J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Nancy Joen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsKaren J. Vander Laan, PhD, MSN, RN, karen.vanderlaan2@spectrumhealth.org; Nancy Jo Roberts, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/307888-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>The global prevalence of Perinatal Mood Disorders (PMD) after giving birth has been reported as 13% in high-income countries and around 20% in low- and lower-middle-income countries.  PMD are serious mental health problems that can lead to complications for mothers, newborns, and families.  The 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), a PMD assessment instrument commonly used worldwide, asks questions regarding the mother’s symptoms and feelings over the past seven days.  As a symptom-based instrument, it can be helpful for ongoing clinical monitoring of a mother at risk for PMD but may not always accurately detect depression risk.  An 11-item Postpartum Depression Risk Assessment (PDRA) was collaboratively developed in 2006 by an interprofessional hospital-based team and is currently used in many maternal-infant units.  The PDRA screens the mother’s risks for developing PMD based on past and current medical, emotional, and social history.  Our nursing staff wondered if it was important to use both instruments so that no high-risk mother would be overlooked.  We conducted a descriptive, comparative, IRB-exempt study of de-identified EPDS and PDRA data collected from a convenience sample of 585 mothers within 24 hours of delivery.  We examined the prevalence of PMD risk and risk profiles for mothers reporting a difficult pregnancy or birth, a multiple birth, or a baby receiving neonatal services.  Comparing the two assessments, we calculated the level of agreement of predicted PMD risk and identified items that clustered together through principal components analysis with oblique rotation.  Four factors were detected:  stress, emotional response, history, and self-harm.  We concluded that the EPDS and PDRA are assessing different risk factors for PMD.  We recommend that both assessments be used in the hospital setting to assure detection of mothers at high-risk for PMD so they can be connected with PMD resources beyond discharge.en_GB
dc.subjectFactor Analysisen_GB
dc.subjectWomen's Servicesen_GB
dc.subjectPatient Safetyen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:23:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:23:40Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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