2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/307898
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship of servant leadership and nurses' job burnout
Author(s):
Chi, Grace C.; Chi, Jerry L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Grace C. Chi, Ph.D., MS, RN, OCN, u_5chi@yahoo.com; Jerry L. Chi, Ph.D., Ph.D., MBA
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Purpose

Many nurses enter healthcare with great passion and optimism. They want to build a seamless system for patients, family, and colleagues. They believe the purpose of nursing is to serve with caring attitude, scientific knowledge, advanced techniques, and great teamwork. Many nurses consider their devotion as a calling to express their passion. However, the strain, workload, and pressure frequently exhaust nurses’ enthusiasm, and idealism. These ultimately lead to tiredness, frustration, and burnout. Servant leadership is a model growing among professionals. The concept begins with serving and inspiring followers. The leader is interested in strengthening followers’ potential, willing to share ideas, achieve shared goals and to serve.  This model emphasized on partnership, trust, listening, and proper use of power.

Methods

The study is to examine whether servant leadership is well implemented in a Christian hospital, to evaluate its influences to burnout levels perceived by nurses, and to identify which servant leadership components influence burnout.  Online surveys are sent. Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Multivariate Analysis of Variance are used.

Result

215 surveys received. The relationship of five virtues of servant leadership in terms of interpersonal support, community building, altruism, egalitarianism, and moral integrity and three burnout dimensions, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishments, in nurses are negatively correlated. The SEM results showed that Comparative Fit Index (CFI) was sufficient: CFI = 0.910, Standardized Regression Weight= -0.68, and Canonical Correlation=0.937.

Conclusion

The findings demonstrate that servant leadership significantly and negatively influences nurse’s job burnout. Perceiving support from leaders is important. Power can be ethically or unethically used.  The concept of servant leadership is similar to the Christian value of service. The practice of servant leadership increases job satisfaction and reduces burnout in nurses. The finding is beneficial in improving healthcare managerial skills to retain nurses and battling with nursing shortage issue.

Keywords:
Nurses' job burnout; Servant leadership
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship of servant leadership and nurses' job burnouten_GB
dc.contributor.authorChi, Grace C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorChi, Jerry L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsGrace C. Chi, Ph.D., MS, RN, OCN, u_5chi@yahoo.com; Jerry L. Chi, Ph.D., Ph.D., MBAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/307898-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Purpose <p>Many nurses enter healthcare with great passion and optimism. They want to build a seamless system for patients, family, and colleagues. They believe the purpose of nursing is to serve with caring attitude, scientific knowledge, advanced techniques, and great teamwork. Many nurses consider their devotion as a calling to express their passion. However, the strain, workload, and pressure frequently exhaust nurses’ enthusiasm, and idealism. These ultimately lead to tiredness, frustration, and burnout. Servant leadership is a model growing among professionals. The concept begins with serving and inspiring followers. The leader is interested in strengthening followers’ potential, willing to share ideas, achieve shared goals and to serve.  This model emphasized on partnership, trust, listening, and proper use of power. <p>Methods <p>The study is to examine whether servant leadership is well implemented in a Christian hospital, to evaluate its influences to burnout levels perceived by nurses, and to identify which servant leadership components influence burnout.  Online surveys are sent. Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Multivariate Analysis of Variance are used. <p>Result <p>215 surveys received. The relationship of five virtues of servant leadership in terms of interpersonal support, community building, altruism, egalitarianism, and moral integrity and three burnout dimensions, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishments, in nurses are negatively correlated. The SEM results showed that Comparative Fit Index (CFI) was sufficient: CFI = 0.910, Standardized Regression Weight= -0.68, and Canonical Correlation=0.937. <p>Conclusion <p>The findings demonstrate that servant leadership significantly and negatively influences nurse’s job burnout. Perceiving support from leaders is important. Power can be ethically or unethically used.  The concept of servant leadership is similar to the Christian value of service. The practice of servant leadership increases job satisfaction and reduces burnout in nurses. The finding is beneficial in improving healthcare managerial skills to retain nurses and battling with nursing shortage issue.en_GB
dc.subjectNurses' job burnouten_GB
dc.subjectServant leadershipen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:23:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:23:50Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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