Picking out the feedback contents to improve medication adherence in home care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/307904
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Picking out the feedback contents to improve medication adherence in home care
Author(s):
Suzuki, Shiori
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Shiori Suzuki, M.M.G, BS, shiori@sfc.wide.ad.jp
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Background:

 More than 70% of elderly take medication as a treatment in Japan. Poor medication adherence is one of the biggest problems in home care. The factors of poor medication adherence are various but the effective intervention from medical staff may improve them(1: Aliotta, Professional Case Management, 2007). To improve medication adherence, we proposed a bidirectional medication assistance system since 2009. The system was consisted monitoring medication data and feedback to patients. After 3 months experiments among 7 patients who take home care, their medication adherence were continually improved.

Aims:

The purpose of this study was to reveal who had the role to give feedback to patients and what contents were required in feedback.

Methods and Results:

 We conducted questionnaires to medical staff who concerned our system. 9 doctors, 18 pharmacists, 42 nurses and 4 other staff fulfilled our criteria. The ratios of who think feedback are effective, non-effective and don’t-know are 77%, 3% and 21%. In addition, the ratios by occupation who want to give feedback to patients are 40% of doctors, 72% of nurses, 72% of pharmacists and 25% of other staff. These results show that the nurses and the pharmacists had an awareness to assume an important role in feedback. And they require the following 3 contents in feedback: to know medication dosage states in each day, to give a message with a medical decision and to notice that patients saw the message.

Conclusions:

We revealed that the nurse and the pharmacists thought they had the responsibility to intervention in medication adherence. They required the contents in feedback that included daily medication dosage states with a medical decision and the response from patients. Our future plan, we continue to re-develop and operate our system to meet the above requirements.

Keywords:
sensor network; Medication adherence; home care
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePicking out the feedback contents to improve medication adherence in home careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Shiorien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsShiori Suzuki, M.M.G, BS, shiori@sfc.wide.ad.jpen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/307904-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Background: <p> More than 70% of elderly take medication as a treatment in Japan. Poor medication adherence is one of the biggest problems in home care. The factors of poor medication adherence are various but the effective intervention from medical staff may improve them(1: Aliotta, Professional Case Management, 2007). To improve medication adherence, we proposed a bidirectional medication assistance system since 2009. The system was consisted monitoring medication data and feedback to patients. After 3 months experiments among 7 patients who take home care, their medication adherence were continually improved. <p>Aims: <p>The purpose of this study was to reveal who had the role to give feedback to patients and what contents were required in feedback. <p>Methods and Results: <p> We conducted questionnaires to medical staff who concerned our system. 9 doctors, 18 pharmacists, 42 nurses and 4 other staff fulfilled our criteria. The ratios of who think feedback are effective, non-effective and don’t-know are 77%, 3% and 21%. In addition, the ratios by occupation who want to give feedback to patients are 40% of doctors, 72% of nurses, 72% of pharmacists and 25% of other staff. These results show that the nurses and the pharmacists had an awareness to assume an important role in feedback. And they require the following 3 contents in feedback: to know medication dosage states in each day, to give a message with a medical decision and to notice that patients saw the message. <p>Conclusions: <p>We revealed that the nurse and the pharmacists thought they had the responsibility to intervention in medication adherence. They required the contents in feedback that included daily medication dosage states with a medical decision and the response from patients. Our future plan, we continue to re-develop and operate our system to meet the above requirements.en_GB
dc.subjectsensor networken_GB
dc.subjectMedication adherenceen_GB
dc.subjecthome careen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:23:55Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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