Overcoming Barriers: Evidence Based Strategies to Promote Breastfeeding Among Low Income Young Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/307951
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overcoming Barriers: Evidence Based Strategies to Promote Breastfeeding Among Low Income Young Women
Author(s):
Manion, Amy B; Lemke, Sally; Bitowski, Billie E.; Wideman, Marilyn K
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Amy B Manion, PhD, RN, amy_manion@rush.edu; Sally Lemke, MS, RN, WHNP-BC; Billie E. Bitowski, FNP-BC; Marilyn K Wideman, DNP, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Breastfeeding rates among African American young women who reside in low socioeconomic urban settings are dramatically lower than any other racial group, even after controlling for income.  In the 1970’s, the breastfeeding rate in the United States reached a nadir of 22%.  Since then breastfeeding rates have been steadily rising, however, breastfeeding rates among African American woman have remained low.  Reported barriers to breastfeeding among adolescents of color include fear of pain, public embarrassment, lack of interest, and unease with the act of breastfeeding. Social support has been proven to be a strong predictor of breastfeeding intention.  Effective social support strategies to promote breastfeeding among adolescents include the use of peer counselors and lactation consultants, inclusion of family in breastfeeding education, and breastfeeding classes.  A breastfeeding/infant support group is one such social strategy that has been implemented at Simpson Academy for Young Women in Chicago at which a Rush University- College of Nursing School Based Health center is located.  The process of implementing this support group as well as the results of this successful ongoing project will be further described in this presentation.
Keywords:
Adolescents; breastfeeding; Health disparities
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOvercoming Barriers: Evidence Based Strategies to Promote Breastfeeding Among Low Income Young Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManion, Amy Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorLemke, Sallyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBitowski, Billie E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWideman, Marilyn Ken_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAmy B Manion, PhD, RN, amy_manion@rush.edu; Sally Lemke, MS, RN, WHNP-BC; Billie E. Bitowski, FNP-BC; Marilyn K Wideman, DNP, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/307951-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Breastfeeding rates among African American young women who reside in low socioeconomic urban settings are dramatically lower than any other racial group, even after controlling for income.  In the 1970’s, the breastfeeding rate in the United States reached a nadir of 22%.  Since then breastfeeding rates have been steadily rising, however, breastfeeding rates among African American woman have remained low.  Reported barriers to breastfeeding among adolescents of color include fear of pain, public embarrassment, lack of interest, and unease with the act of breastfeeding. Social support has been proven to be a strong predictor of breastfeeding intention.  Effective social support strategies to promote breastfeeding among adolescents include the use of peer counselors and lactation consultants, inclusion of family in breastfeeding education, and breastfeeding classes.  A breastfeeding/infant support group is one such social strategy that has been implemented at Simpson Academy for Young Women in Chicago at which a Rush University- College of Nursing School Based Health center is located.  The process of implementing this support group as well as the results of this successful ongoing project will be further described in this presentation.en_GB
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen_GB
dc.subjectHealth disparitiesen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:24:34Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:24:34Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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