Bullying, Incivility, and the Generations: Where Do Nurses Learn Incivility

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308000
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bullying, Incivility, and the Generations: Where Do Nurses Learn Incivility
Author(s):
Nogueras, Debra J.; Adelman, Deborah S.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Phi
Author Details:
Debra J. Nogueras, PhD, ARNP, BC, debbie.nogueras@nau.edu; Deborah S. Adelman, PhD, RN, CNA, BC, CNS
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Purpose: Bullying and incivility in nursing has reached epidemic proportions both in academia and practice.  This presentation will focus on results from a longitudinal, on-going study examining the coping behaviors of nursing students when faced with difficult situations and how proposed early interventions and curricular intervention can break the cycle of violence in the nursing profession.

Methods: Utilizing the "Bullying in Nursing Education Questionnaire" and an additional short answer question, participants identified their level of perceived bullying behavior, and how they have dealt with a challenging situation involving bullying in nursing school or in their position as a professional nurse.  

Results: The majority of the participants in this study reported positive coping behaviors (e.g., reported behavior to superior or person of authority, spoke directly to bully, or warned the not to do it again).  However, many reported negative behaviors (e.g., did nothing, put up barriers, pretended not to see the behavior, or increased use of unhealthy coping behaviors such as smoking, overeating, and increased alcohol consumption).

Conclusion: Interventions grounded in coaching and positive psychology will be presented, incorporating multi-generational challenges, strategies, and techniques which can easily be incorporated into nursing curriculum and professional continuing education offerings.  Questions of whether negative behaviors are generational in nature or solely related to bullying and/or incivility will also be discussed.  This presentation will identify generational differences and potential interventions.  Holistic interventions presented will be broadly categorized as communication, rooting (i.e., centering, presence, and intent), opening (i.e., acknowledging what exists, surrendering, and compassion), and engaging (i.e., remaining calm and taking action).

Keywords:
Bullying; Incivility; Academia
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBullying, Incivility, and the Generations: Where Do Nurses Learn Incivilityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNogueras, Debra J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAdelman, Deborah S.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNu Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsDebra J. Nogueras, PhD, ARNP, BC, debbie.nogueras@nau.edu; Deborah S. Adelman, PhD, RN, CNA, BC, CNSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308000-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Purpose: Bullying and incivility in nursing has reached epidemic proportions both in academia and practice.  This presentation will focus on results from a longitudinal, on-going study examining the coping behaviors of nursing students when faced with difficult situations and how proposed early interventions and curricular intervention can break the cycle of violence in the nursing profession. <p>Methods: Utilizing the "Bullying in Nursing Education Questionnaire" and an additional short answer question, participants identified their level of perceived bullying behavior, and how they have dealt with a challenging situation involving bullying in nursing school or in their position as a professional nurse.   <p>Results: The majority of the participants in this study reported positive coping behaviors (e.g., reported behavior to superior or person of authority, spoke directly to bully, or warned the not to do it again).  However, many reported negative behaviors (e.g., did nothing, put up barriers, pretended not to see the behavior, or increased use of unhealthy coping behaviors such as smoking, overeating, and increased alcohol consumption). <p>Conclusion: Interventions grounded in coaching and positive psychology will be presented, incorporating multi-generational challenges, strategies, and techniques which can easily be incorporated into nursing curriculum and professional continuing education offerings.  Questions of whether negative behaviors are generational in nature or solely related to bullying and/or incivility will also be discussed.  This presentation will identify generational differences and potential interventions.  Holistic interventions presented will be broadly categorized as communication, rooting (i.e., centering, presence, and intent), opening (i.e., acknowledging what exists, surrendering, and compassion), and engaging (i.e., remaining calm and taking action).en_GB
dc.subjectBullyingen_GB
dc.subjectIncivilityen_GB
dc.subjectAcademiaen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:25:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:25:14Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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