An intervention to increase knowledge level of signs and symptoms of heart attack among African American women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308008
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An intervention to increase knowledge level of signs and symptoms of heart attack among African American women
Author(s):
Lawrence, Wanda
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho lambda
Author Details:
Wanda Lawrence, PhD, RN, MSN, lawrencew@wssu.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013

Cardiovascular disease ( includes heart attack and chest pain) is the number one killer of American women and more than half of the deaths are directly attributable to "heart attack",  resulting in many deaths within one hour of onset of symptoms and generally before reaching a hospital.  Heart attack is a health disparity which has received attention nationally over the last decade. However, the death rate for African American women who have heart attacks continues to be twice that of white women. Literature addresses three specific problems facing African American Women who have heart attacks: they are not aware of risk factors, they do not know the signs and symptoms of a heart attack, and they delay treatment. It is documented in the literature that African American women tend to present symptoms of a heart attack that are atypical, thus not responding in a timely matter, resulting in delay treatment and death.  Receiving treatment as early as possible can delay morbidity and mortality. Consequently, if African American women do not recognize these atypical signs, then they will continue to delay initiating emergency treatment resulting in a continued increase in deaths related to heart attack. 

This research employs focus groups as the research methodology to verify if African American women ages 25-65 in two counties exemplify the atypical symptoms addressed in the literature.  In addition, the study explored the participants' knowledge level and recognition of signs and symptoms of heart attack.  Data obtained from these focus groups was used  to design an intervention to address this critical health disparity in these counties. The intervention is designed so that women can learn about heart attack and then "give back" to their community. This presentation will focus on the methodology used in the study and the research findings.

Keywords:
Heart; Symptoms; knowledge
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn intervention to increase knowledge level of signs and symptoms of heart attack among African American womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Wandaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentRho lambdaen_GB
dc.author.detailsWanda Lawrence, PhD, RN, MSN, lawrencew@wssu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308008-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Cardiovascular disease ( includes heart attack and chest pain) is the number one killer of American women and more than half of the deaths are directly attributable to "heart attack",  resulting in many deaths within one hour of onset of symptoms and generally before reaching a hospital.  Heart attack is a health disparity which has received attention nationally over the last decade. However, the death rate for African American women who have heart attacks continues to be twice that of white women. Literature addresses three specific problems facing African American Women who have heart attacks: they are not aware of risk factors, they do not know the signs and symptoms of a heart attack, and they delay treatment. It is documented in the literature that African American women tend to present symptoms of a heart attack that are atypical, thus not responding in a timely matter, resulting in delay treatment and death.  Receiving treatment as early as possible can delay morbidity and mortality. Consequently, if African American women do not recognize these atypical signs, then they will continue to delay initiating emergency treatment resulting in a continued increase in deaths related to heart attack.  <p>This research employs focus groups as the research methodology to verify if African American women ages 25-65 in two counties exemplify the atypical symptoms addressed in the literature.  In addition, the study explored the participants' knowledge level and recognition of signs and symptoms of heart attack.  Data obtained from these focus groups was used  to design an intervention to address this critical health disparity in these counties. The intervention is designed so that women can learn about heart attack and then "give back" to their community. This presentation will focus on the methodology used in the study and the research findings.en_GB
dc.subjectHearten_GB
dc.subjectSymptomsen_GB
dc.subjectknowledgeen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:25:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:25:20Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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