2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308011
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning the Language of Leadership in the Online Classroom
Author(s):
Moore-Cox, Annie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Tau
Author Details:
Annie Moore-Cox, PhD, RN, anniemoorecox@gmail.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013

The online classroom of today differs from the “traditional” asynchronous discussion classroom of a decade ago. Increases in Internet accessibility and bandwidth enable the application of video and synchronous communication in the online classroom but, as with so many educational efforts, little research is conducted to determine the effect these technologies have on learning outcomes. Graduate nursing education has moved online for many schools and students, in both purely online and hybrid classroom offerings. But the common feature for much online learning is still asynchronous discussion. I studied the asynchronous discussion produced by a cohort of nursing administration students to find out if and how they learned to be nurse administrators. I used the tool of sociolinguistic research called discourse analysis to examine the classroom discussion between students during a nine month period. What I found was the ways in which students enacted identities and experimented with their emergent professional selves. They evidenced professional role socialization in discussion through observation, using the discussions to share their successes and failures at applying newly learned nursing administration theories and concepts to their work contexts; experimentation or “trying out” the identity of the nurse administrator, using the language of the field, and  evidencing an ever broadening perspective of the entire healthcare delivery system; and evaluative reflecting, sharing the anxiety and tension of changing professional identities often by reframing their ideas about caring and advocacy  while working to maintain their identity as “nurses.”

Though it is always tempting to adopt new and exciting technologies, this study showed that the online asynchronous discussion provided students with a richly contextualized environment for learning and a place to develop nursing knowledge. This “traditional” online classroom tool may be an important means of encouraging student learning in terms of professional role socialization

Keywords:
Education; Online; Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning the Language of Leadership in the Online Classroomen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore-Cox, Annieen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Tauen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnnie Moore-Cox, PhD, RN, anniemoorecox@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308011-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Monday, November 18, 2013</p>The online classroom of today differs from the “traditional” asynchronous discussion classroom of a decade ago. Increases in Internet accessibility and bandwidth enable the application of video and synchronous communication in the online classroom but, as with so many educational efforts, little research is conducted to determine the effect these technologies have on learning outcomes. Graduate nursing education has moved online for many schools and students, in both purely online and hybrid classroom offerings. But the common feature for much online learning is still asynchronous discussion. I studied the asynchronous discussion produced by a cohort of nursing administration students to find out if and how they learned to be nurse administrators. I used the tool of sociolinguistic research called discourse analysis to examine the classroom discussion between students during a nine month period. What I found was the ways in which students enacted identities and experimented with their emergent professional selves. They evidenced professional role socialization in discussion through observation, using the discussions to share their successes and failures at applying newly learned nursing administration theories and concepts to their work contexts; experimentation or “trying out” the identity of the nurse administrator, using the language of the field, and  evidencing an ever broadening perspective of the entire healthcare delivery system; and evaluative reflecting, sharing the anxiety and tension of changing professional identities often by reframing their ideas about caring and advocacy  while working to maintain their identity as “nurses.” <p>Though it is always tempting to adopt new and exciting technologies, this study showed that the online asynchronous discussion provided students with a richly contextualized environment for learning and a place to develop nursing knowledge. This “traditional” online classroom tool may be an important means of encouraging student learning in terms of professional role socializationen_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.subjectOnlineen_GB
dc.subjectNursingen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:25:23Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:25:23Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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