The nurse leader's accountability in nurse fatigue: Ten tips for successful intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308024
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The nurse leader's accountability in nurse fatigue: Ten tips for successful intervention
Author(s):
Brooks, Ann Marie T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa
Author Details:
Ann Marie T. Brooks, DNSc, RN, MBA, FAAN, FACHE, FNAP, annmariebrooks@hotmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013

Nurse leaders are expected to represent the voice of nursing at the executive table and serve as the champion for quality and safety for patients and staff.  While there are many competing priorities for resources within any healthcare organization, the safety of patients and staff should be a top priority and driver in the decision making for senior leaders.  Nurse executives understand the challenges facing bedside nurses and other assistive personnel involved in direct patient care.  Their role requires them to be activists and experts in translating both objective and subjective data into a business plan with specific strategies to achieve organizational and department goals and priorities.  Nurse fatigue is recognized as a major issue facing nursing because of its negative impact on the quality and safety of patient care and worker satisfaction and retention.  Studies demonstrate the effect of nurse and worker fatigue on serious medical errors, workflow issues and lack of service excellence causing increased risk to patients, increased costs and increased frustration within the work environment.  While nurse leaders oftentimes acknowledge the complex and challenging role of the direct care nurse, minimal progress has been made by professional organizations or healthcare institutions to address nurse fatigue and the continual expansion of expectations placed on the bedside nurse.  This presentation will highlight some leading practices and offer practical strategies that have been developed by the partnership of beside nurses with nurse leaders and that can be used in healthcare organizations across the globe.
Keywords:
Accountability; Nurse fatigue; Nurse leader
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe nurse leader's accountability in nurse fatigue: Ten tips for successful interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Ann Marie T.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentKappaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnn Marie T. Brooks, DNSc, RN, MBA, FAAN, FACHE, FNAP, annmariebrooks@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308024-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Nurse leaders are expected to represent the voice of nursing at the executive table and serve as the champion for quality and safety for patients and staff.  While there are many competing priorities for resources within any healthcare organization, the safety of patients and staff should be a top priority and driver in the decision making for senior leaders.  Nurse executives understand the challenges facing bedside nurses and other assistive personnel involved in direct patient care.  Their role requires them to be activists and experts in translating both objective and subjective data into a business plan with specific strategies to achieve organizational and department goals and priorities.  Nurse fatigue is recognized as a major issue facing nursing because of its negative impact on the quality and safety of patient care and worker satisfaction and retention.  Studies demonstrate the effect of nurse and worker fatigue on serious medical errors, workflow issues and lack of service excellence causing increased risk to patients, increased costs and increased frustration within the work environment.  While nurse leaders oftentimes acknowledge the complex and challenging role of the direct care nurse, minimal progress has been made by professional organizations or healthcare institutions to address nurse fatigue and the continual expansion of expectations placed on the bedside nurse.  This presentation will highlight some leading practices and offer practical strategies that have been developed by the partnership of beside nurses with nurse leaders and that can be used in healthcare organizations across the globe.en_GB
dc.subjectAccountabilityen_GB
dc.subjectNurse fatigueen_GB
dc.subjectNurse leaderen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:25:32Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:25:32Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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